3 Lessons I Learned About Online Privacy When My Teen Googled Her Name

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When my daughter Googled her name following a conversation with friends about who is on the Internet, I turned out to be her biggest online privacy problem. The results of the name search displayed several photos from my personal blog that we thought were labeled anonymously. Uh oh.

what I learned about respecting my child's privacy online

"Mom, why is my sports photo showing up on an Internet search?" she asked.

Good question, I thought. I should know better.

And so began a series of steps to understand our digital footprint before she enters the world of social media on her own terms. I learned more from this experience than any privacy workshop, and I would like to share how we are addressing and correcting the problem.

Lesson 1: Evolving as a parent

As a parent, I needed to realize that my daughter is not a toddler anymore. She has opinions about how she is (or is not) presented online, and my job is to completely respect those opinions.

My old default was to be proud of some milestone and shout it out, just like I did when they started walking, talking or playing. My new default is to chill out. If they have something to share, they will soon be able to share it themselves.

For the past two years, my Facebook feed dropped off from family sharing, specifically for this reason.

what I learned about respecting my child's privacy online

Image: Josh Hallett via Flickr

Lesson 2: Even if I think I'm sharing anonymously, Google still has a way of figuring things out!

I never shared their first and last name combinations on a post, but Google still linked the last name from my profile with her first name, displaying her data on a name search.

In instances where I thought she was totally anonymous, Google+ circumvented the anonymity by linking text from a friend's comment. Ugh! Should I have been using code names from day one? Or, should I have opted out completely from the online sharing universe?

Lesson 3: Third parties that seem innocuous, like sports leagues, have their own set of issues.

Another photo that popped up was from an old team roster. This sports league required photo IDs for every player and getting the IDs printed required uploading the photo to their database.

Did their database have a delete function for players? No. Were these rosters searchable over the internet? Yes. Do I wish I would have known that in advance? Yes! Lesson learned.

Attempted fixes

After running a name search on my personal blog, I substituted every first name reference to a generic "my daughter" or "my oldest" or "my youngest." I did the same thing on Facebook by searching for my daughters' names and adjusting or deleting any named posts.

This seemed to fix the search listings on both platforms. Unfortunately, Google+ is less cooperative. Even after deleting a post, the search results are still displaying the image. Next, I contacted the sports league director to request player privacy. They responded right away, but it's taking awhile for the new privacy settings to take effect.

Moving forward

If I had to repeat the last decade, what would I do differently? Blogging is an incredibly satisfying part of my life. I enjoy sharing stories, forming opinions, and connecting with others online. I also enjoy parenting. Luckily, I have great kids who learn along with me.

I asked if they wanted to make the blog private or take anything down, and they said no. They enjoy looking back on our journeys and experiences together, even moreso now that they are becoming digital citizens themselves.

Today, I try to use more discretion before posting, keeping photos generally scenic or symbolic. When a photo is identifiable to mark a special moment, I ask permission first. What started as my personal blog is becoming a shared family archive that we enjoy.

As new social platforms emerge, like Instagram, I show them my account and let them scroll through, so we experience (and learn) together how it works.

This strategy seems to be working just fine, for now... until the next episode comes along!

Lorraine Akemann | Cofounder and Editor | Moms With Apps

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