Best Picture Dinners: Midnight in Paris

BlogHer Original Post

Over the past ten years, I've felt very mixed about Woody Allen's films. When he's on, these days, he's really on—his movies are funny and human and delightful. But when he's off, his films feel self-indulgent and flat. Luckily for moviegoers in this Oscar cycle, with Midnight in Paris, Allen was totally on, creating a lovely, frothy fantasy where love and struggling writers win in the end. It deserves a Parisian feast in celebration.

Midnight in Paris still

We'll start our meal with a dish that raises hackles with some folks, but which I'll fully admit to loving: perfectly seared foie gras. Give this Foie Gras Poele with Granny Smith Apples from Jacqueline Pham of Pham Fatale a try—it's a simple preparation that sets lovely acid flavors against the rich goose liver.

For a cocktail, I wanted something that evoked the feel of the movie without necessarily being 100 percent Parisian. I decided the perfect choice is The French 75, which marries champagne (or sparkling wine if you don't have the French variety on hand) with gin, simple syrup and lemon juice in a refreshing-yet-tart cocktail. Drink too many close to midnight and you might, indeed, have trouble finding your way back to your hotel.

Our main course will be Duck a l'Orange with Pomegranate and Persimmon from Eva of Adventures in Cooking. It's a classic dish made modern with the addition of beautiful winter fruits. Serve a rustic melange of onions and turnips that have been tossed in olive oil, salt and pepper, and roasted for about 45 minutes in a 425-degree oven, and arugula tossed with this perfect vinaigrette from Katie of Mom's Kitchen Handbook.

We'll want to finish this dinner with true French flair, so I'd recommend assembling a cheese platter. But if you can't bear to bid this meal adieu without a sweet little bite, then this classic creme brulee from Grace of La Mia Vita Dolce will do the trick.

What foods did Midnight in Paris evoke for you? Share your movie-inspired thoughts in the comments below.

Genie blogs about gardening and food at The Inadvertent Gardener, and tells very short tales at 100 Proof Stories. She is also the Food Section Editor for BlogHer.

Image Credit: Sony Pictures Classics

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