Sedentary seniors get cognitive boost from yoga

I've posted before about how yoga is good for your brain, but a new study from the University of Illinois has found that even sedentary seniors can gain a cognitive boost from doing hatha yoga three times a week for eight weeks.In the study, they followed 108 people between 55 and 79 years old. First, they gave them all cognitive tests to create baselines. Then, 61 did Hatha yoga for eight weeks and the remaining participants did non-yoga stretching and toning....more

New study finds seniors' brains function better in the morning

I'd heard that Alzheimer's patients often experience "sundowning" - the term for mental decline at the end of the day, but new evidence says it's more than that. The new study says older adults perform better on cognitive tests in the morning. According to the lead author of the research, older adults are more focused and can better ignore distractions during th emorning. In the afternoon, seniors showed signs of "idling" when researchers studied their brains with fMRIs....more

If I'm Okay and You're Okay, Is It Still Okay To Want to Better Myself?

At the halfway mark in my fifth decade of life, I have grown weary of the endless conversation with myself concerning my weight. I flip-flop between scolding myself over my lack of initiative, motivation and action to do something about it, and making patronizing, coddling excuses for just accepting the inevitable, continuing weight gain; a gain that is averaging about ten additional pounds each decade since becoming an adult....more

Warrior Pose

Eulalia Benejam Cobb (Lali)Blog:  MyGreenVermont.comWebsite:  www.LaliGallery.com...more

Growing Old Gracefully (or NOT)

Ah, aging. If you have hit 40, possibly even your late 30's, then you are familiar with the feeling of dismay that comes when a new sign of aging appears. These signs come in a variety of ways, both physical and mental. Gravity kicks in. You lose your tolerance for Rap music. Hangovers last a minimum of 2 days. Your kids start having theme parties based on the decade you graduated from High School. The list is endless really....more

Part 1 - Getting Older

Most of the time I don't think or stress about aging. It will happen, no matter how I feel. For the most part, getting older is great, or at least I'm neutral about the whole process. But sometimes, I don't like to see it in action. The gray hairs creeping up. The crackly joints, getting louder. My nails are changing, ridges appearing where they used to be smooth. Not impressed, at all....more

Brain cell transplant restored memory and learning in mice with Alzheimer's

When it comes to making gains in the fight against Alzheimer's, it doesn't take much to get me excited. Once you see what the disease does to someone you love, any hope for a cure (or to slow down symptoms) is great. In a new study from the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco and the University of California-San Francisco, scientists were able to reverse learning and memory deficits in mice with Alzheimer's. ...more

50. How Not to Make it the New 75

50. How Not to Make it the New 75...more

Bringing in the Sheaves

My day was mixed. I got up early to work on an analysis of our city's new coordinated entry system for people who are homeless. I am at home with data, tallying things in new directions, finding patterns hidden from the less patient. This is what I'm good at - translating the little picture to the big picture - so I was happy to have this be my day. The tallying and charting. Nothing better....more

How well do you know your brain?

http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/24/health/improve-memory-brain/I ran across this article on how to get your brain in shape and thought I'd post some of the highlights, many of which are just interesting facts:1. There are 86 billion active neurons in your brain2. Your brain uses 20% of your energy3. Gray matter (which carries out thinking) uses most of this energy4. White matter (which relays signals and coordinates the brain regions) is pretty energy-efficient5. Neurons rewire themselves based on your genes and experiences...more