Jellyfish in the Baby Pool: Protecting my child with special needs

Sometimes parenting a child with special needs is like the time I was shocked to find a jellyfish in the baby pool. Dangers and complications lurk where you least expect it. ...more

How My Child with Special Needs Made Me a Filmmaker

When my son slept in the incubator in the NICU, I didn't know what to do. I couldn't straighten up due to the stitches in my abdomen. The delivery was an emergency c-section. My IV stood next to me like a shadow. I spent many hours there, waiting for my son to come home. I put my hand on the plastic box, wishing I could touch him. I didn't know it then, but that is when I became a filmmaker. ...more

Dear Parent of Typical Children: Teach Your Child About Disability

Your children watch and learn from you, every day, every moment. They listen to your words, imitate your actions, follow your cues on how to behave in new situations, and mimic your example on how to interact with people they meet. And they will learn, from you, how to understand disability. ...more
YES! I think talking about it is SO important! I have had the chance the past two years to share ...more

Pathologizery

Anyone with a special needs kid of any kind wrestles with how much to pathologize, how much to accept, how much to change, how much to except and hope.  This is just one perspective from one complicated diagnosis but maybe, hopefully, it can start us all thinking and talking more openly about what our options really are - medical and non-medical.  http://planbust.blogspot.com/2014/09/pathologizery.html...more

When special needs kids are bullied

I've got two articles to share on this topic. The first is a new study that indicates that kids between 8 and 10 who are bullied are more likely to experience nightmares, night terrors and sleepwalking at age 12. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/282488.phpThe other piece is "Why bullies target struggling students (and how you can help!)"http://media.learningrx.com/why-bullies-target-struggling-students-and-h......more

Tic, tic, tic...

Have you ever seen anyone that has a tic? Not a tick, the little black insect that burrows under your skin, but body tics–brief, repeated movements or noises that a person makes.  Very often tics are associated with Tourette’s Syndrome.  Do you know what I’m talking about?...more

To the Back of the Bus: Finding a Place for All

The crowd streamed onto the bus. Everyone set for a day at the fair. "Where do you want the wheelchair?" I asked the driver. The bus was old, it didn't have a wheelchair lift or space to sit. "Right here," the driver said. "I'll put it next to me." We'd waited in line; the kids were antsy. We had no idea when the next shuttle arrived. We shuffled to the back of the bus and stood as no seats remained. ...more

Changing Conversations: When Parents Murder Disabled Children

Michigan parent Kelli Stapleton recently pled guilty to poisoning her autistic teen daughter Issy. According to police reports, Kelly lured Issy into a van, "drugged her, lit the grills and left the van to get more charcoal while her sleeping daughter breathed in poisonous carbon monoxide fumes." Kelli and Issy both survived the attempted murder-suicide....more
pseudopodia Shannon Des Roches Rosa newzealanditisthen Jess at Diary of a Mom summarized how I ...more

Treating infants with autism may prevent further symptoms

It's a pretty big claim, but one that Infant Start developer Sally J. Rogers stands by.The theory was that the sooner therapy begins, the better the chances of preventing the full onset of symptoms. In this case, the therapy/treatment is provided at home and focuses on interactions between the parent and child during everday routines. ...more