A Good Hard Look

BlogHer Review

A Good Hard Look by Ann Napolitano is an extremely good book; I found it hard to put down. You should read it. The End.

That is what I'd love to say in this book review, mostly because I found myself to be in the dark as to where the author was going with this book from the very beginning -- and there is a part of me that feels that the author meant her book to be read that way.

Sure, I knew it was set in a small Georgia town, it said so on the first page... but other than that I was completely clueless as to even what year it was until the very end when there was finally mention of President Kennedy's assassination. The chapters weren't titled, nor were they numbered, both of which I found to be very odd. Regardless, the author, Ann Napolitano, wove a story that that was so well written that my own curiosity would beg me to continue onto the next chapter.

Chapter by chapter, the characters took turns telling their story, building their case for who they were and why their reactions were valid. It was with ease that I grew to care about the sweetness of Cookie, the wicked dry humor of Flannery, and the loneliness of Lona. They were all a part of one another's lives in some form or another. The men in their lives -- Melvin, Joe, and Bill -- would help to interconnect their stories, their reactions, and their beings. And then there were the peacocks -- which were the background music, the comic relief, the one-two punch, and the main act. The peacocks brought the story to life.

I honestly don't know how I can describe this book in greater detail without giving away the storyline. Therefore, forgive me if I just say that you should go now, find a copy of A Good Hard Look, and read it. I promise that you'll be mesmerized by the story. Hopefully you'll walk away with a new look on your life, see value how you spend your time, and find joy in your family and friends. I know that I did.

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