Book Club - How to Be an American Housewife

Deborah Harkness
Alex George
Ann Napolitano
William Deresiewicz
Jessica Spotswood
Geraldine Brooks
Brené Brown
Stephanie McAfee
Sophie Morgan
Tana French
Terry McMillan
Jen Lancaster
Geneen Roth
Julie Klam
Amy Kalafa
Ally Condie
Julia Cameron
Kate Marshall & David Marshall
Sylvia Day
Edited by Stacy Morrison, Julie Ross Godar & Rita Arens
Amor Towles
Jeremy Page
Dominique Browning
Karen White
Stephen Dau
Laura Moriarty
Laura Dave
Sapphire
Kim Edwards
Jeffrey Zaslow
Claire Bidwell Smith
Seré Prince Halverson
Eleanor Brown
Kelly McGonigal, Ph.D.
Lisa Gardner
Linwood Barclay
Liane Moriarty
Gayle Forman
William D. Lassek, M.D. & Steven J.C. Gaulin, Ph.D.
Vanessa Williams & Helen Williams

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How to Be an American Housewife
Margaret DillowayAuthor: Margaret Dilloway
What Did You Think of the Book?

Is the Past Ever Really Just the Past?

"The past is the past" is a phrase that runs through Margaret Dilloway's How to Be an American Housewife. It is uttered by most of the characters at one time. Shoko tried to shake off the past but she couldn't. It was with her every day. Is the past ever really just the past? Does the past not shape everything that we are?  Read more >

Navigating Mother-Daughter Relationships

Shoko's relationship with her daughter Sue in Margaret Dilloway's How to Be an American Housewife is one of the most vital parts of the book. Shoko's attempts to push Sue in various directions cause her to pull away. Sue's attempts to show interest in things that her mother does or loves causes Shoko to push her away. Sometimes mother-daughter relationships are more like a game of tug of war than a cooperative three-legged race.  Read more >

Do You Have A Guidebook For Life?

In Margaret Dilloway's How to Be an American Housewife, Shoko uses a book by the same name as her guidebook to American life. Sometimes she likes the book, other days she hates it. But it's there for her when she needs it to offer advice, comfort or just the recognition that she's not the only woman in her position.  Read more >

What Does Forgiveness Look Like?

I thought a lot about forgiveness while reading Margaret Dilloway's How to Be an American Housewife. What does it mean to forgive? Have I ever sought it the way the characters have? Is there someone in my past that I have not forgiven?  Read more >

Relearning How to Cook and Live

While reading Margaret Dilloway's How to Be an American Housewife, I was struck by how much of my daily like I take for granted. I speak the local language. I know what most things are in the grocery store and how to cook them. I know what's expected of a school science fair project. I know all of this because they are all things I learned growing up. Shoko didn't.  Read more >

Were You a Disobedient Girl?

Margaret Dilloway's How to Be an American Housewife starts with Shoko declaring "I had always been a disobedient girl." The second part of the book, told from Shoko's daughter Sue's perspective, starts with Sue's declaration, "I had always been an obedient girl." It made me wonder, am I disobedient? Or am I obedient?  Read more >