Break-up: Facebook blocks the emotional healing process


After a separation, stay connected as “friends” with ex-partner block the process of emotional healing and personal growth.

Faced with the difficulty of a breakup, some feel the need to stay in touch with their ex-partner, at least for a short period. With Facebook, it becomes possible since the inner life of each is almost exposed publicly. According to the work of the psychologist Tara C. Marshall, published in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior, Networking, star of social networks in facilitating contact with ex-partner, prevent them from moving forward after separation.

To achieve these results, the teams interviewed 464 participants most of whom are young American women age entering the University. The latter are expressed on the memory of a painful breakup (hatred, frustration, sadness, etc..) With a person who had a Facebook account and informed the researchers on the frequency with which they consulted their page or friends list their ex-partner.

Mourning

According to survey data, 57% of participants remain “friends” with their ex, and the vast majority (90%) of them admitted to having access to one wall (photos, comments, etc.). . For those who were not “friends”, 86% of participants could see the profile picture of the former partner and 72%, his friends list. Difficult in these circumstances, to go forward, especially when the other proudly displays his new conquest. The study demonstrates that the effect of Facebook friendship with a former partner is “associated with a feeling of distress, negative emotions, sexual desire and expectation to the ex-partner and a low personal development “. “Healing after the loss of a relationship implies the need to recover a portion of any resentment and detach from each other, but also to build a new narrative that enables personal growth,” says the author study, Tara C. Marshall. For this, “avoid contact, at least for a time, would be the best cure for a broken heart.”

A finding which is not surprising Michael Stora, a psychologist and specialist digital worlds, for which this use of Facebook does not avoid heartbreak. “Stay hyperconnected will make more difficult the work of mourning in time, because the person will remain tyrannized by the image or the memory of the other.”

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