Can Your Child Identify a Tomato? Teaching Kids About Food

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I recently watched a preview from Jamie Oliver's show Food Revolution where first grade children were unable to identify fruits and vegetables like tomatoes, potatoes, cauliflower, eggplant, etc. While I didn't find it shocking, I thought it was quite sad. It drives the point home that as a society we are, as Oliver points out in his TED talk (which is absolutely worth 20 minutes of your time), very disconnected from our food and where it comes from.

Sure, kids eat french fries and ketchup, but do they know they're made from potatoes and tomatoes? Oliver points out that the current generation of children may be the first in two centuries to have a shorter life expectancy than their parents. Of course after that I had to quiz my five-year-old Ava (to make sure I wasn't being overly critical) and she knew what everything was except the beet (which we don't eat because I think they taste like dirt.)



Ava's kindergarten class is currently doing a section about food. My daughter already knows a fair bit about what she eats since she's been gardening with me since before she could walk. We also have friends who have chickens and we frequently visit the farmers' market. I don't know what specifically her class is being taught about food, but I imagine it's pretty light and upbeat (i.e. no information about factory farming, genetically modified organisms, etc.). That's OK with me, though. I feel like you can only give five-year-olds so much information. They have plenty of time to learn more about the current farming practices in the United States when they get older.

I have been impressed that they made butter in school by shaking a jar full of cream and will be making applesauce as well, and are even hatching baby chickens in an incubator in the classroom. They also took a field trip to a supermarket. A trip to a community garden would have been nicer, but there's not much to see at a garden in Colorado in early March. Regardless, I'm glad that her school is teaching young children about food and hope that others around the country are as well.

Earlier this week I finally sat down to watch Food, Inc. for the very first time. My kids, ages three and five, who were not yet in bed sat down too, ready to watch along side me. I had a conversation with myself in my head for a minute. Should I let them watch it? I haven't yet seen it so I have no idea what to expect. But it's about food and where food comes from, and that's educational, right?

I decided to turn it on and keep the remote in my hand in case anything looked like it might get too gory or inappropriate for them. Ava watched it quite intently and asked me several questions. Julian, my 3-year-old, watched bits and pieces while he wasn't busy playing. Actually, one of the things he started playing (after watching a scene where a factory chicken farmer collects dead chickens was "throw the dead chickens (stuffed animals) into a bucket." It was rather fascinating to see him reenact that scene.

At one point, I stopped the movie to gauge Ava's reaction and ask her how watching it made her feel. She replied, "Sad and happy. Sad because people have to eat the chickens. Happy because I'm learning." That reinforced my decision to let her watch it. I was very happy to hear that learning made her happy.

We ended up watching only half of the movie together before it was time for the kids to go to bed and they missed some of the more gruesome scenes like the lame cows, pig slaughterhouse and the scene of the traditional farmer and his workers killing and processing chickens (which really wasn't that bad). After seeing it all now though, I think they would have been OK with watching it.

Food, Inc. is rated PG "for some thematic material and disturbing images" and that seems very fair. I wouldn't let children watch it on their own, but I think if they watch with a parent it's a great learning opportunity for all parties involved.

This spring we will start getting chickens (to eat) from a local farmer and I think a field trip of sorts to visit the farm and the chickens is in order. We're also hoping to get chickens or maybe ducks of our own for eggs once we move and have more land. The more I can expose my children to where their food comes from, the better.

We're not perfect. We go out to eat and even eat *gasp* fast food and junk food from time to time, but my kids know what a tomato is, they see me cooking and gardening and help me with those things. All of that, I believe, will help establish healthy patterns that will last a lifetime and will hopefully keep them from becoming a statistic.

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Contributing editor Amy Gates writes about attachment parenting, green living, and living with an anxiety disorder, among other things, at Crunchy Domestic Goddess and tweets at @crunchygoddess.

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