CDC Food Allergy Guidelines: Who Are They Really Protecting?

I recently heard Kim Turner speak at the USAnaphylaxis Summit hosted by AANMA.  In her speech she explained negligence and reckless, willful and wanton conduct which in layman terms means that once an individual is certified in doing something (epi training) they are held legally responsible to act accordingly (using epi).  If harm is done due to the certified individual not acting accordingly (delaying use of epi), then said individual can be held legally accountable (sued).  The Good Samaritan Law only protects the teacher if they are outside of the workplace.  Keep this in mind when reading the following information.

 

Below, you'll find excerpts straight from the 108 pages of Voluntary Guidelines for Managing Food Allergies in Schools by the CDC. The document has wonderful information and is proof that food allergy awareness is rising. However, I feel the need to point out what is missing. Many of you will not read all 108 pages but I urge you to read the few paragraphs below, especially the bold print. The contradictory information provided shows just how far we still need to go to make our schools a safer place for our children, all of our children.


It admits that the delayed use of epinephrine has contributed to MANY fatal cases. It admits the risk of death outweighs the risk of side effects from using epinephrine. It also states that epinephrine needs to be administered immediately. YET, it also states that school nurses are not required in all schools, epinephrine is still being locked up, and the only one required to administer epinephrine is a nurse or someone who willingly took the training knowing that it now holds them legally responsible to do so.

Think about the last part of that sentence...
The only one required to administer epinephrine is a nurse or someone who willingly took the training knowing that it now holds them legally responsible to do so.

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