Kick-start Winter Composting With -- Well -- Worms.

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It's no secret that I hate to see things go to waste. I have been known to dig recyclable items out of the trash and attempt to Freecycle or otherwise give away some of the craziest stuff before I will consider tossing it in the trash. I really have a hard time throwing away table scraps and fruit and vegetable peels, especially considering my children eat fruit like there's no tomorrow. All of that fruit adds up to a whole lot of orange peels, apple cores and watermelon rinds. Honestly, that's the biggest reason I started composting. I hated seeing how much food waste was going into the garbage and knowing it only ended up in the landfill. Sure, the end result of making your own fertile soil which is great for gardening is an added bonus, but mostly I compost to reduce my family's garbage output.

I didn't start out trying to do vermicomposting (or composting with worms). We got a composting bin, set it up in a relatively sunny spot in our mostly shady backyard, and got to work. Along the way, I threw in several shovels-full of dirt, hoping it would speed up the composting process. Apparently I threw in some worms too, which reproduced like rabbits. It didn't take long for my regular compost bin to become a worm composting bin. I think it's a little freaky, but my kids get a big kick out of all of the worms in there and have been known to fish some out just for fun.

However, due to the cold in Colorado this winter, my compost bin hasn't been working very well. In fact, when I dig into the pile, I find lots of frozen (dead?!) worms. I'm sorry wormies. And my food waste is not being broken down like it is in the summer. As a result, some of our food waste has gone down the garbage disposal (which isn't a good option, because it uses a lot of water and energy to process at the water treatment plants) and I've also thrown some into the *gasp* garbage. It breaks my little green heart.

My friend Julie, who also lives in Colorado, ran into the same frozen composting dilemma this winter and decided to start worm composting in her basement. The idea of having a bin full of worms in your house might skeeve some people out, but the worms are contained, and it's a very practical way to keep your food waste out of the landfills. While I haven't set up my own system yet, I have started learning more about it. Not only is it a great option for people who live in colder climates, but it's great for apartment-dwellers or others who don't have a yard in which to put a traditional compost bin.


Photo credit: Bramble Hill

Why compost?
Recycling the organic waste of a household into compost allows us to return badly needed organic matter to the soil. In this way, we participate in nature's cycle and cut down on garbage going into burgeoning landfills.

What is vermicomposting?
In the simplest terms, "vermicomposting is a system for turning food waste into potting soil with the help of worms."

What do I need to get started?
According to Worm Woman, you will need:

  • An aerated container
  • Bedding such as shredded newspaper
  • Moisture and proper temperature
  • Small amount of soil
  • Redworms (Eisenia fetida)

Learn more about vermicomposting:

If not for the fact that we are trying to get our house ready to go on the market and I need another project like I need a hole in my head, I would totally set up a worm composting bin in my house right now. But the worm bin project (along with getting chickens project and what else is there?) will have to wait until we have sold our house and have moved into our new abode.

Contributing editor Amy Gates also blogs about attachment parenting, green living, living with an anxiety disorder and other topics at Crunchy Domestic Goddess.

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