Cooking Lesson: Curried Carrot Ginger Soup

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It’s not yet spring but I can’t help it; Winter I am done with you!  I wrote a year ago (click HERE to read it)  about the importance of eating seasonally and highlighted the Spring season.  There are a few vegetables that go hand in hand with Spring and carrots are one of them.  Peas are another (try my Pea and Watercress Soup for another Spring soup option) Spring, naturally, is a very cleansing time of year and my Curried Carrot Ginger Soup fits the bill.

This soup is probably one of the first soups  I learned how to make in cooking school, oh so long ago, and it still does not disappoint.  Earthy, light, and of course everything “free” (no gluten, dairy, animal, low calorie, etc.) it is delicious and filling with a hint of spice in it.  Watch the video (I include a couple of bonus techniques!) to see how easy it is to make. Go forth into Spring!

Curried Carrot Ginger Soup

Makes about 2 quarts

Ingredients

2 tablespoons organic canola oil
2 medium onions, chopped coarse
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
2 pounds carrots (about 12 medium), peeled and chopped coarse
1 tablespoon grated ginger root
1 tablespoon curry powder
6 cups vegetable stock or water

Directions

  1. Heat the oil in a large soup pot over medium high heat. Add the onions, salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until soft, about 5 minutes. Add the carrots and continue cooking for another 5 minutes.
  2. Add the ginger root and curry powder, stirring constantly, about 30 seconds. Add the vegetable stock and bring the soup up to a boil. Bring down to a simmer and partially cover, for about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  3. When the vegetables are tender, turn off the heat. Using a food processor or blender, puree the soup in batches. Add the soup back to the pot and reheat gently over low heat. Adjust the seasonings if necessary and serve hot.

NOTE: When pureeing hot soup be extremely careful not to overload the food processor or blender.  Steam from the soup can make it spurt up when the machine is turned on.  To be cautious, only fill up the blender or food processor 1/3 of the way and be sure to have an opening to let the steam out.

Copyright© Heather Carey, MS 2014

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Heather Carey, M.S., Culinary Nutritionist

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