This Day in Legal History: “Legal Stalking?”

Earphones I know I promised a Cyberstalking post today, but I overestimated my time and underestimated my to-do list and my exhaustion. If you will recall from my 2011 goals post, time management is on the list…I'm working on it. Instead I found this tidbit from "This Day in Legal History" series at http://jurist.org:

 

DOJ defended legality of NSA warrantless wiretaps


On January 19, 2006, the US Department of Justice (DOJ)
released a white paper laying out a legal basis for the domestic surveillance program run by the National Security Agency (NSA). The paper argued that the NSA activities were supported by the president's constitutional authority as Commander in Chief and congressional authorization for the war on al Qaeda under the 2001 Authorization to Use Military Force. Additionally, it argued that the wiretaps "fall within a well-established exception to the warrant requirement and [satisfy] the Fourth Amendment's fundamental requirement of reasonableness."

Source: http://jurist.org

The Scoop

Is this a version of "legal stalking" by the government? Do you recall your thoughts about the warrantless wiretaps back on January 19, 2006? What do you think of this practice today? I do remember this activity, but on January 19, 2006, I was 14 weeks pregnant with Darling 1 and my mind was abuzz with other more important things.

I'll post on Cyberstalking laws and issues later this week. I'm off to make a beer cake for DH's Birthday. Yes, a beer cake. I'll let you know how it turns out. Over and out…

Anna

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