How to Get Published: Before We Even Get Started (Part One)

BlogHer Original Post

Thinkstock Single Image Set

I am a published author. And you can be, too.

My background: I have an MFA in fiction. I published a nonfiction book with Seal Press called Navigating the Land of If in May 2009, and I have a work of fiction titled Life from Scratch being published by BelleBooks for release in December 2010. I am currently working on a new book proposal for a piece of nonfiction while simultaneously working on edits for BelleBooks (and starting the second book in that series).

That’s my experience; other people may have different experiences with publishing that they can add in the comment section below. This information comes from what I've gleaned from my MFA program, my agent, other writers, and my own experience.

First things first: Unless you are selling movie rights or have royalties coming in from dozens of books at once, it is very hard to support yourself entirely with book publishing. Most of my income comes from articles and speaking engagements. Very little of it comes from book publishing, but book publishing is unique in that it has a cumulative effect. I do the work now, but I'm paid now and well into the future. Once you have several successful books collecting royalties, it is possible to earn a decent supplemental salary writing books. But most people will need to continue teaching or freelance writing.

Here's how this series will work: Over several posts (outlined below), I will walk you through what you need to do to publish either a work of nonfiction or fiction including what to expect with each leg of the process from idea to holding your book. Others will chime in with their experience and ask questions that I'll answer in the comment section below.

These posts will never close, so even if you are reading this years into the future (hello 2012! Are we still living above-ground?), you can leave a legitimate question below, and I will answer it. Though since this information is spread out over many posts, please place your question on the appropriate post, and if that post hasn't gone up yet, trust that I will get to that topic in the future (and if I don't, ask your question then).

Before our first class, you should take a look at this list of terms that I'll be using as I walk you through the process from having an idea to holding your book in your hands. I'll be adding terms to this initial list as these posts unfold.

So let's begin by doing a roll call of everyone who wants to learn how to get published. Why? Because in the future, I'm going to suggest that you hook up with a few other writers, and in order to do that, if you don't have people in your face-to-face world, you can contact someone below who has a different type of blog from your own. So, in this roll call, please state your blog name, give the url in the appropriate url space so your name is linked to your blog, and tell us a little bit about what you write (werewolf romance novels, memoir about your year of baking 365 pies, how to book on catching squirrels as pets). Keep it as general as possible, please.

Heads Up: Topics that will be covered in future installments (and this is subject to change as questions are asked and information unfolds):

1. THIS POST

2. Getting Started: How to Decide If You’re Ready to Get Published and Make a Platform That Agents Will Take Seriously

3. How to Write a Non-Fiction Book Proposal and Choose Your Chapters

4. Why You Need an Agent

5. How to Find and Sign with a Reputable Agent

6. Querying Agents

7. What Happens Next -- Waiting for a Book Sale

8. No Agent? Other Paths to Publication

9. What to Expect After You Sign a Book Deal

10. Be Your Own Publicist

11. A Mishmash of Leftover Questions and Answers

Okay, now go call your own name in the roll call.

Melissa writes Stirrup Queens and Lost and Found. Her book is Navigating the Land of If.

Follow BlogHer on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/groups/BlogHer-28615

Comments

In order to comment on BlogHer.com, you'll need to be logged in. You'll be given the option to log in or create an account when you publish your comment. If you do not log in or create an account, your comment will not be displayed.