DIY-To Paint or Not to Paint

Ah, that is the million dollar question. Last week I posted a photo of a refurbishing painting project I did for my mom’s entryway. I took an old knotty pine cupboard that had seen better days, that we had purchased for next to nothing at auction…

Knotty Pine Cupboard

and transformed it using chalk paint and wax. The results were quite lovely,

Painted Pine Country Commodeor so I thought, until I posted the blog on an awesome home and garden website called HomeTalk that I contribute to on occasion. This is a website where homeowners and DIY’ers show off their latest projects, ask advice from novices and experts and share information and comment about everything from growing cabbage to building garages. The after picture I posted set off a torrent of comments that were sorted into three distinct groups.

Country Pine Commode Painted

A. The “I LOVE this!” These are the folks that appreciate a good paint job and had no problem with me transforming this piece for the sake of design and style. As Michele from MD stated:A new life for an old piece! Beautiful!”

B. The “Well, you did a nice job, but maybe you should have left it knotty pine and not painted it?” This group was being nice ( I thank you : ). Though deep down they thought I should have left it alone, they appreciated my painting efforts. From Tamara in IL: “Nice job, however, I am sad that yet another nice piece of wood has died an embarrassing death at the hands of someone with a can of white paint.”

C. Then, the third group, the “why the heck did you go and ruin a perfectly good piece of furniture by painting it!?” These folks were adamantly opposed to my taking a paint brush to this piece of furniture. As Barbara from IA said: “Again all I see is a beautiful piece of wood furniture painted white and then “distressed”. What happened to sanding and linseed oiling the beautiful wood. Natural wood is so much more beautiful! Paint something made out of junk wood, not good natural wood!"

Which group do you belong to? Click here to read the rest of the story:

Ah, that is the million dollar question. Last week I posted a photo of a refurbishing painting project I did for my mom’s entryway. I took an old knotty pine cupboard that had seen better days, that we had purchased for next to nothing at auction…

Knotty Pine Cupboard

and transformed it using chalk paint and wax. The results were quite lovely,

Painted Pine Country Commodeor so I thought, until I posted the blog on an awesome home and garden website called HomeTalk that I contribute to on occasion. This is a website where homeowners and DIY’ers show off their latest projects, ask advice from novices and experts and share information and comment about everything from growing cabbage to building garages. The after picture I posted set off a torrent of comments that were sorted into three distinct groups.

Country Pine Commode Painted

A. The “I LOVE this!” These are the folks that appreciate a good paint job and had no problem with me transforming this piece for the sake of design and style. As Michele from MD stated:A new life for an old piece! Beautiful!”

B. The “Well, you did a nice job, but maybe you should have left it knotty pine and not painted it?” This group was being nice ( I thank you : ). Though deep down they thought I should have left it alone, they appreciated my painting efforts. From Tamara in IL: “Nice job, however, I am sad that yet another nice piece of wood has died an embarrassing death at the hands of someone with a can of white paint.”

C. Then, the third group, the “why the heck did you go and ruin a perfectly good piece of furniture by painting it!?” These folks were adamantly opposed to my taking a paint brush to this piece of furniture. As Barbara from IA said: “Again all I see is a beautiful piece of wood furniture painted white and then “distressed”. What happened to sanding and linseed oiling the beautiful wood. Natural wood is so much more beautiful! Paint something made out of junk wood, not good natural wood! “

My response was this: “… (back in the day) you just never painted over old varnished wood, no matter what the style or condition. But, there are times when paint is appropriate and necessary-ie: I love the look of deep, dark wood moldings and wainscoting in a magnificent victorian home, and would not paint that, but I don’t really care for stock stained molding and trim in more modern homes. Paint away, I say! But, I would also say that I would never paint an “important” vintage or antique piece! I appreciate the fact that furniture just serves a purpose in our homes and whatever decoration is on the exterior does not change its usefulness-it is simply a personal design preference. This currently popular “old chippy, distressed look” came about because DIY’ers started pulling pieces of old painted furniture out of attics and barns (instead of trashing them and adding them to landfills), taking a fresh look at them and then duplicating the look with newer pieces. The design world has come full circle, and I, for one, applaud the DIY Dumpster Divas out there who continue to rescue and re-beautify old pieces so that they can be enjoyed for many more years!”

So, which group are you in? A, B or C? To read the rest of the story, click here: http://countrydesignhome.com/2014/05/06/diy-to-paint-or-not-to-paint/

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