Overeating in seniors tied to memory loss

A new study tying overeating and memory loss in seniors was recently presented at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting.The research suggests that older people who overeat might DOUBLE their risk for mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MCI is the stage between normal age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer's. Here's the study:http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/241570.php...more

Trade Grandma's stationary bike for a Wii to keep her brain strong

You probably already know that exercise is good for the brain. After all, it increases oxygen to the vital organ.But a new study from the Healthy Aging and Neuropsychology Lab and Department of Psychology at the Union College in Schenectady, NY has found that "exergames" beat traditional exercise when it comes to keeping the brain in shape....more

Odd Day

 Odd DayWent to visit his mom today; a brilliant lady, valedictorian of her class, who achieved her Master’s Degree and taught grade school until her late 60′s, retired and sadly as dementia set in, needed to be relocated closer to family....more

Mentality

Original post at xoxoxo eMy family has always prided itself on their intellectual pursuits. We're all bibliophiles. We love to learn new things. We're perpetual students. So I'm finding it very hard at times to deal with my mom's dementia....more

Cognitive function can start failing as young as 45 (not 60 as originally thought)

I'm 41, so this is definitely not good news.Many brain experts believed that it wasn't until age 60 that age-related cognitive decline could kick in. Specifically, they believed that memory, aural comprehension and visual comprehension could begin to decline at age 60 (if it occurs at all).But a new study out of the UK and France (part of the study started in 1985) seems to show that cognitive decline can begin as early as age 45. ...more

alzheimer's has knocked on my door, again...

I guess all of us have a "story". A story that explains what drew us, as professionals, to caring for patients and families suffering from Alzheimer's disease or another type of dementia. Over the years, I have heard so many stories from my colleagues about how Alzheimer's disease has touched them personally. Stories about their mom or dad or grandparents. Stories about how Alzheimer's invaded their lives and made them passionate professionals, experts and advocates. They have built careers in part, because this disease is so much a part of their daily lives. ...more

Good news! Deep brain stimulation found to reverse damage from Alzheimer's!

Don't you just love good news? I ran across this study today and felt very hopeful:http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/238309.phpA team in Canada did a study on the effects of deep brain stimulation in people with early Alzheimer's. They found that when they applied electrical pulses directly to the fornix (part of the brain that shrinks first), they:1. improved memory2. improved cognitive function3. reversed some of the existing damage caused by Alzheimer's...more

A Tale of Two Deaths: Losing My Mother to Alzheimer's, Part I

Marci Your story is important. Please post the second part. Just roaming around and found part ...more

Two days down...a lifetime to go...

Two days down...a lifetime to go... So...my aunt experienced her first weekend in her new home.  Amazingly, after her first night there on Friday, which was anything but peaceful, she has remained calm...she still wants to go home...repeatedly asking for a taxi...but, she is pleasant and calm....more

What are we doing here, anyway?

What are we doing here, anyway? The ER doctor sat with his back to me, facing my aunt, speaking softly and slowly.  My heart sank as he first walked through the door...he looked to be about 16 years old...hair neatly pulled back into a long ponytail and he spoke with a slow, twangy West Virginia drawl...my only thought was that he looked like a 2011 version of Doogie Houser, MD...What on earth could this kid possibly know about geriatrics, Alzheimer's and what it's like to try ...more