Ferguson: Connecting with Our Community on Twitter

BlogHer is a diverse community and never was that more evident than in today's Twitter chat about Ferguson, the racial tensions stemming from the shooting of Michael Brown and the grand jury decision not to indict Darren Wilson, the police officer who shot and killed him....more

New Kids' Album Celebrates All Families

Families with same-sex parents are only one of the many types of families celebrated in the warm and funny new children’s album Dancin’ in the Kitchen, by two-time Grammy Award-winning duo Cathy Fink and Marcy Marxer....more

I Watched You Dance: A letter to the Father of an adult son with Down Syndrome

Dear Father: I once watched you and your adult son, who has Down Syndrome, enjoying an outdoor summer concert together. I still think about that day, because I couldn’t stop staring at the two of you (but not for the reason one might think). The relationship you have with your son was one of the most beautiful, precious things I have ever seen. It brought tears to my eyes. I wanted to talk to you and your son so badly, but out of respect for you (and my husband, who gets embarrassed when I make a scene) I simply observed from a distance....more

For Kaitlyn: Down Syndrome Awareness Month

Since October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month I want to honor of all the beautifully unique, valuable individuals who happen to also have Down Syndrome. This month makes me think in particular about precious Kaitlyn.  I wish you could have met her.                     ...more

"I'm sorry, Ken, but that is incorrect." My response to Jeopardy champ's hurtful tweet

Jeopardy champ Ken Jennings made the following tweet yesterday: “Nothing sadder than a hot person in a wheelchair.” The Twitterverse almost immediately exploded. Some people laughed, most were outraged. Jennings has not yet responded to inquiries and comments about the tweet. Part of me wanted to resist giving this ableist nonsense any more exposure, nor give that person any more free press, but I just have to say: I’m sorry, Ken, but that is incorrect....more

Where Are the Brown Girls in Teen/YA Books?

I went to the 2014 National Book Festival with two of my daughters.  Elle, a high schooler, is the voracious reader of the family.  Often times, before any of the rest of us can finish reading – or even begin to read – a book that we’ve checked out of the library or bought at the bookstore, she has “borrowed” and finished the book, then handed it back with a quick review.  No book is safe in her arm’s reach (and she has long arms.)  Nat came along, too; still in elementary school, she reads when and if she feels like it. ...more
yes and yes.  #WeNeedDiverseBooks! in most Ya novels I've read the black kid is usually the ...more

Why Minority Voices Matter in the Autism Community

“What can the white special needs community do to help the brown special needs community?” I was asked this question at the BlogHer ’14 Special Needs Mini Con session in San Jose, CA. I had to pause when I heard it. I wasn't ready....more
misssalad Kpana Kpoto EmiliePeck Race comes into it because it's so closely tied into the ...more

Why Adults Need Diverse Books Too

Why aren’t we reading more adult fiction by writers of color or about the non-white experiences? As much as the news outlets like to tout it, reading isn’t dead. At least once a week, a Facebook friend will ask for book recommendations. Social media has made reading more social. We share status updates about our current reads, rave about books we love, and even track our reading progress all through social media. ...more
Grace Hwang Lynch Ab.so.lutely!!more

*Glamour in ALL Shades*

SOOOOO what’s up with this? Don’t sit up there and act like you haven’t noticed it too! I need answers…LIKE NOW!...more

We Need Diverse Books (And That Means Comics Too!)

Earlier this spring, my daughter was thrilled to find Wonder Woman and Cyborg on her cereal box. I collected my thoughts on how something that seems simple, two comic book stars as advertisement, was actually a big deal. We don't often see superheroes as anything other than white men. Seeing Wonder Woman, a female superhero, and Cyborg, a black superhero, featured on the cereal box and on the free comic inside is worth talking about, and worth demanding more of. We don't have enough comic book characters, and especially superheroes, who represent all of us. ...more