How do you teach a child with dyslexia?

Understanding DyslexiaAccording to the Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity, 1 out of 5 people are dyslexic, making it one of the most common learning disorders. Dyslexia causes individuals to have difficulty in reading and spelling. Dyslexic children have difficulty in decoding and reading words, and cannot recognize common “sight words” such as “in” or “the”....more

A Belated Holiday Letter for All the Late Bloomers

I was rifling through a stack of papers on the counter yesterday and came across a holiday letter that arrived in a card from some friends of ours around Christmas. Okay. I feel your sneer of judgment. Yes. I still have holiday mail on our kitchen counter. Guess what? We still have a broken, faux Christmas tree lying on the floor in the rec room too....more

Writing in Reverse

“If you can’t believe in miracles, then believe in yourself. When you want something bad enough, let that drive push you to make it happen. Sometimes you’ll run into brick walls that are put there to test you. Find a way around them and stay focused on your dream. Where there’s a will, there’s a way.” ...more

Understanding Dyslexia: Basic Facts About This Learning Disability (INFOGRAPHIC)

Learning to write and read is really hard to do, especially when you have a learning disorder like dyslexia. Also called specific reading disability, it affects 1 in 10 kids and 2.9 million children in the United States. Dyslexia is not a matter of intelligence or visual acuity and is not related to a person's IQ....more

He'll be OK!

I have a friend who has a son who is 18 and in his final year at school. He has just received an offer from a university, conditional upon him gaining an A,B,C in his A levels (the final year of  secondary school in the UK). This is a truly remarkable thing. You may think it's not that remarkable as you will know that students all over the country will be receiving offers and some will have more difficult obstacles to overcome in terms of grade requirements. But this is an amazing achievement for this young man....more

Dyslexia: Think Dyfferent.

Here is the public service announcement that runs in my head: My child does not write his letters backwards. My child excels in math. My child is the best speller out of my three children. My child is funny. My child works hard for his grades. My child can read. My child is kind. My child is a nationally ranked tennis player. My child is dyslexic. And, I love him. Dyslexia I love the apple slogan ( I wish I had thought of it): Think Different...more
While my son has ADHD, not dyslexia, this post is so timely! We just had a conversation today ...more

What reading a novel does for your brain

A new study out of Emory University found that reading a novel can have lasting changes on your brain (in a good way -- no comment on novels like "50 Shades of Gray").The study recruited 21 undergrads who promised to read "Pompeii" when told. (It's a 2003 thriller by Robert Harris about a volcano in Italy erupting.)For 5 days, the researchers studied the students' brains with fMRIs while in a resting state....more

The Girl Who Taught Me How To Spell Love

The Girl Who Taught Me How To Spell The Word Love  ...more

October is Dyslexia Awareness Month

October is also Dyslexia Awareness Month. Jennifer P. Williams talks about her daughter's experience with dyslexia, a disorder that impairs a person's ability to read. They go to see Dislecksia: The Movie, a documentary about dyslexia, and she emerges from the theater with renewed energy to help her daughter combat her reading disorder. ...more
This was such a great post jen_p_williamsmore

Being Her Own Advocate: Growing Up with Learning Disabilities

Imagine that you are afraid of public speaking, I mean really terrified of it. And yet, had a job that required you to address large groups everyday. The people around keep saying that it will get better, that the support is in place, that you will be fine.But you are not. It is just that sinking feeling in your gut day after day day after day.When you have a learning disability, walking into class everyday goes beyond a struggle with the alarm clock. It is day after day of feeling like you are dumb, that you are hopeless. The struggle is constant. ...more
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