Giving Our Tweens Confidence and Holding Them When They Fall

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One of the challenges we face as parents is to raise confident children who will take risks. However, in helping our children learn how to do so, we have to be ready to catch them when they inevitably fall. It's a hard things to do sometimes.

Christi at My Tempered Tantrum shared about her daughter's recent run for student council, her confidence and the resilience she showed when she didn't actually win. I want to give Christi and her daughter a big high five for being so darn awesome.

Have you recently stood by and watched your child take a similar risk?

Of Student Councils and Public Speaking:

MicrophoneShe approached the microphone hesitantly, eyes focused on the worn carpet beneath her feet, purposefully avoiding a glance at the crowded room. At the podium, she spread her note cards out, cleared her throat, and looked up. Nearly one hundred faces stared back at her expectantly. She wiped a single drop of sweat from her brow, took a deep breath, and began.

The first words flowed from her mouth with ease. Her clenched fists spread open, her shrugged shoulders dropped back, her head raised a bit higher. Her voice was clear and confident. No ‘ums’ or ‘uhs’ betrayed her nervousness. She paused in all the right places, she gestured perfectly, her inflections added emphasis. The crowd laughed at the funny parts, responded eagerly to her questions, and followed her every word. As she finished her speech and took a small step back from the podium, the crowd erupted into applause, hoots, hollers, and cheers. She walked off the stage, triumphant, hopeful that her fellow 6th graders would vote her in to Student Council.

That was my daughter’s speech, as I imagine it to be. Being eleven-years-old and nervous, she had adamantly requested that I not be there to watch. I obeyed.

Photo Credit: pahudson.

Read more from Of Student Councils and Public Speaking at My Tempered Tantrum

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