The Facebook Pastor, TwitChange and Social Media

BlogHer Original Post

Shaun King

Shaun King is known as the “Facebook Pastor.” He is the founder of the Courageous Church in Atlanta, Georgia. Prior to the church opening its doors, Shaun wrote blog posts,  tweeted and wrote Facebook status updates about the new church. Courageous Church is now 18 months old, and Pastor Shaun continues to conduct outreach by actively utilizing the social media. His tweets for donations have provided 500 toys for children at Christmas, assistance for victims of the 2009 Atlanta flood and $1.2 million worth of tents for people displaced by the earthquake in Haiti.

The newest endeavor of the “Facebook Pastor” is TwitChange, which is touted as the first-ever celebrity Tweet auction. With the help of actress Eva Langoria, it was launched on September 15th with over one hundred celebrities from various niches participating. The list includes Demi Moore, Justin Bieber, the Jonas Brothers, Shaquille O’Neil, Boris Kodjoe, Guy Vanerchuk, Perez Hilton, Usher and Kim Kardashian.  Fans bid for the opportunity to be tweeted, followed or mentioned by their favorite celebrity. Several celebrities have upped the ante by adding special bonuses.  Actress Lisa Raye will go to dinner with her highest bidder, author Neil Gaiman will read select works, and actor Zachary Levi (with a current bid of $11,200 second highest so far) has not revealed his bonus, but promises it will be good.

All proceeds from the auction will benefit A Home in Haiti, which is funding The Miriam House,  a home for severely disabled children. Groundbreaking took place in August, but an estimated $1 million is needed to complete the project.

I’ve recently become a member of Courageous Church and support doing good works by utilizing social media. I was drawn to the vision “Love God, Love People, Prove It,” because all that I’ve seen the church doing has been to the benefit of others. Very light on rhetoric and heavy on positive actions.

What do you think about the intersection of church and social media? Do you think that it should be like the (supposed) separation of church and state?

Renée is a BlogHer contributing editor and the author of  Cutie Booty Cakes


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