The Greenest Female CEOs in America

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Though the modern female CEO is still outnumbered by her male counterparts, women have made some power strides in today's biggest businesses. About 20 of the largest companies in America are run by woman, with an increasing number being promoted each year. Not surprising, a lot of the women lead companies that go one step further than generating profits –  they care about the environment. Check out the power players in some of the biggest companies in the United States:

  • Virginia Rometty, CEO of IBM

In 2012, Forbes reported Virginia Rometty as the most powerful woman in business. Rometty leads one of the world's largest companies, which is very active in supporting green initiatives. In fact, IBM's first environmental policies date back to the early 1970s, long before much of the world was concerned with climate change and environmental impact. And the company hasn't stopped since. In 2013, under the leadership of Rometty, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency presented IBM with the Climate Leadership Award for its supply chain leadership.


IBM CEO

Image: © Krista Kennell/ZUMA Press.

  • Indra Nooyi, CEO of PepsiCo

As the leader of one of the biggest beverage and food companies on the planet, Nooyi has turned heads by creating a leadership style that investors have questioned. Nooyi has initiated a business plan of "performance with a purpose," largely to restructure PepsiCo to focus on healthier alternatives, both for customers and the environment. Though the plan goes against what has been the company's core offering, the board has publically backed her goals. The plan focuses on creating a sustainable future through innovative uses of energy, partnerships with local farmers and investments in local communities.

  • Ellen Kullman, CEO of DuPont

After Kullman was named CEO of Dupont in 2009, she immediately began to restructure the company. The chemical company, which is now more than 200 years old, has been revamped to focus on sustainability and humanitarian needs. In April, the company was honored by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for its improvements on the availability and production of crops in Africa. In addition, DuPont has launched a series of projects to help safeguard the environment and protect life on earth.

  • Meg Whitman, CEO of Hewlett Packard

Whitman is one of those rare women who have a chance to lead a company more than once. Before taking the reins at HP, she served as CEO of eBay for a decade. HP has reduced its energy consumption by 50 percent as well as increasing recycling and creating more eco-friendly products. In total, the company has reduced its carbon footprint by 20 percent. Though Whitman took the job at HP with only $1 in base pay, Forbes reports her net worth at more than a billion dollars, through a combination of investments and bonuses. 

~Ashley

Ashley Joyce is the webmaster at EnergySavings.com and a freelance blogger on green energy innovation and design for the greater good. 

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