Hairy Situation

Now I’m not one to wish my time away, as the old people say, but if I could speed up an event that normally drags on, I would choose hair wash day! This may seem frivolous to some, but if you are an African American female you know my plight. This is not to say that women of other races don’t spend a ridiculous amount of time on their hair care, but it is much more difficult for Black ladies. Whether you are Team Natural or Team Weave/Relaxer, you must agree that it is crazy trying to maintain our locks.

Let’s start with Team Natural, of which I am a member…. There are a million products being pushed at us to use on our hair these days. My normal process is to wash my hair with shampoo or co-wash. Once that is complete I apply a leave in conditioner to help moisturize and detangle my hair. Then I have the enjoyable task of detangling my hair. This may sound simple, but the process is very time consuming and can be painful. During this part of the process I choose to divide my hair into four sections and work the wide tooth comb through each section until there are no tangles. Now I am a strong lady, but sometimes this can bring a tear to my eyes. Seriously tears! After all of my hair is finally detangled, I then have the chore of deciding how I would like to wear my hair for the rest of the week. I usually choose to wear a twist out style which means I have to then put another hair crème moisturizer on my hair and separate it into small sections and commence the two-strand twist process. All of this is done on the clock because the drier my hair gets, the more it will shrink. When detangled and wet my hair falls just above my breasts, but once it dries it shrinks to chin level or shorter. By the way, this is normal for black hair. If I can’t twist fast enough to complete my entire head before it dries, I use a spray bottle with water and olive oil to re-wet my hair. Now comes the tricky part, I have to let it air dry which usually takes hours! If I take the twists out before the hair is completely dry my entire week is shot and my hair looks a hot mess! Because I was brought up never to leave the house with a scarf on my head, I must stay indoors until my hair is dry. God forbid I leave the house and someone sees me in a scarf. Someone will be on the hotline to my mom and I would be in serious trouble, still in my forties! You can see how inconvenient washing my hair is and is usually done on a day pre-planned not to leave the house. Fellas, if a lady has natural hair and tells you she is washing her hair, trust me she’s not blowing you off. This thing is a process and it takes TIME!

Now for Team Weave/Relaxer: I am less familiar with these processes, but I have been in the beauty shop and seen ladies getting their weaves. There is much more to a weave than just sewing it in. The stylist must first treat your real hair by washing and deep conditioning it which means, you guessed it, sitting under that Hot as Hades hair drier with the hood! Once that is done, then you have to have your hair braided, which is a chore and can be painful. Then it takes a while to sew the tracks into your braids. If you are getting a relaxer instead of a weave, you sit in a chair while the stylist burns your hair into submission with a chemical compound that has the ability to burn your face, scalp or even your hair out. It is not comfortable and Lord help you if you scratched your head before putting the relaxer in.  Once the hair is sewn in or your relaxer has been rinsed out and hair conditioned and blown dry, you have to style it which could include cutting and curling or flat ironing; all of which take a great deal of time.

After reading this I hope you can understand what an enormous amount of time women spend getting their hair to look decent. I love the results of washing my hair or getting it styled, however, it takes way too long and that is why I would speed up the process if I could! 

Comments

In order to comment on BlogHer.com, you'll need to be logged in. You'll be given the option to log in or create an account when you publish your comment. If you do not log in or create an account, your comment will not be displayed.