I Wash my Hair Every Day: Why you Should take Advice with a Grain of Salt

As entrepreneurs, tips about anything from social media to how to network, to ways to design your sales pages are free-flowing. Often times, the tips and advice given are really general and don’t have much to do with specific situations.

Some people give advice at the most unwelcome times. Once, I posted my new sales page in one of my favourite Facebook groups and someone thought it was a good idea to pick it apart and give me advice on how to change it. I was so not asking for that! I was so offended that I couldn’t respond. I didn’t care about the quality of the advice, because the unsolicited nature There are people who’s advice I totally trust (an awesome business coach I’ve been working with, my best friend, my favourite cousins) but, I still need to decide whether or not I want to follow it at that particular time.

The hair thing? Totally true! I know people who wash their hair every other day, once a week or less often. But for me, the tried and true amount to wash my hair is daily. Advice from magazines, beauty companies etc tell me that my hair will be dry and my scalp irritated with too-frequent washing. I have to say that my hair is pretty awesome—doesn’t need to be dyed, processed or covered with tons of beauty products. It’s shiny and smooth and naturally wavy. Clearly, ignoring that piece of advice has been working for me.

If anyone has advice on how to tell people I don’t want want their advice, please let me know. :)

All advice isn’t good advice, no matter who’s offering it up. 

Take advice with a grain of salt

So, how do you sift through all the free-flowing advice and figure out what to consume? How do you take advice with a grain of salt?

The way I see it, you have two options available:

One—try it out and see if it works for your particular situation/where you are in your business and life.

Two—listen to your gut.

If “something” is telling you to go for it—use the advice given in your life/business. Listen.

Or try asking yourself these questions:

1. Is this something I want to focus on right now?

I put together my main page just to finish off my website revamping process. I know it isn’t the most awesome thing ever—and I have seen tons of advice out there on how to up the awesomeness level. . .but, I’m not focusing on that right now. I’m not completely dismissing advice on main page design, so I put everything in Evernote to check out later. This way, all that advice isn’t occupying my to-do lists and my mind.

2. How does this fit in with my business message?

I’m not someone who thinks you should “niche down” to the point where you aren’t doing anything other than producing content, all the while ignoring your impulses to start new income projects, ventures and what-nots. Figuring out what message you want to bring to the world and focus on will allow you to quickly and easily choose (I had a little help with this messaging stuff from Rebecca Tracey of The Uncaged Life, recently).

3. Does it make you feel more awesome/excited/inspired/motivated?

Sometimes I read a blog post or piece of advice on social media and think to myself “this is so awesome!”—that’s a pretty sure sign that I should see how I can use the information in my life and business in some way. That kind of reaction means taking that advice is a no-brainer.

Oh, and maybe you should take all of this advice (above) with a grain of salt, too. . .

It’s your turn: I want to know what makes you decide to take advice.

Or maybe: what was the best piece of advice you received, and how did you use it in your life/business?

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