It's All About the Details: Beams

When you think of beams (wood or steel), you automatically think of a ceiling treatment.  And in general that is mainly where you see beams.  Beam designs vary from very rustic to elaborately ornate.  In homes today, we mostly see beam designs in between the two.  While beams can be on the ceiling, you can also use them as headers for your doors, openings, windows, and mantles.

Tuscan Style, Spring/Summer 2012 Issue

Tuscan Style, Spring/Summer 2012 Issue

Rustic-salvaged beams are header for opening into a kitchen.  Another way to use beams architecturally.   Designer: Amy Studebaker

Tuscan Style, Spring/Summer 2012 Issue

Beams follow the vaulted ceiling, reminiscent of a barn.  The refurbished beams were bleached to lighten years of oxidation and then stenciled.  Designer: Erin Paige Pitts Architect: Wayne Good

Tuscan Style, Spring/Summer 2012 Issue

Beams in the kitchen stained dark.  Clean smooth beams, not rustic or rough.  Beams define space--love the huge contrast of the dark stained beams and cabinets against the neutral walls and island cabinets.  Architect: Mark Candelaria  Designer: Caroline Tyler DeCesare

Tuscan Style, Spring/Summer 2012 Issue

Yes, beams do not have to lay horizontally or vertically in direction; you can do something different.  Say a diagonal!  Great way to catch the eye and make a statement.  I love that the planks diagonal direction runs in the opposite direction of the larger, main beams.  Combo of the different sizes and weight in beams.  Love the trimwork in the open space that frames the entry way from the other room.  Designer: Stephanie Davis Architect: Dorothy Howard  Builder: Lorton Mitchell

Tuscan Style, Spring/Summer 2012 Issue

One solid rustic beam serves as the mantle with 3 small carved brackets supporting it.  The combo of stain and paint is nice and light.  Love that the fireplace awl is simple and that the beam is the main focal point on the fire wall.  Designer: Lynn Pries

Tuscan Style, Spring/Summer 2012 Issue

Simple "X" pattern using 3 beams.  Designer: Tamara O'Horgan

Renovation Style, Spring 2012 Issue

Painted wood box beams.  This is the standard beam treatment we tend to see most of today.  Notice how the beams die into the space--A furr out of the ceiling to frame the beams, so they do not die into the wall itself.  There is a combination of large and small beams.  The beams are finished with a crown piece at the top and a small PM piece to finish the bottom of the beam.  Designer: Kim Clements

Elegant Homes, Spring/Summer 2012 Issue

Boxed beams again creating a coffered ceiling.  The panels are stenciled and faux finished.  The beam is topped with a crown and the bottom sides of the beam are coved to soften the edges.  The crown has a glazed finish-creating depth and detail.  Designer: Ken Brown

Renovation Style, Winter 2011 Issue

Beams with beadboard panel insets--casual feel.  The bottom of the beams are finished off with a PM piece as well--clean look.  Architect: Stuart Disston  Designer: Ken Gemes

Renovation Style, Winter 2011 Issue

Tray ceiling with only 2 beams running vertically in the space.  Trimmed beams.  Notice that the bottom of the Tray has a trim detail as well.  Designer: Cindy Galvin

Tuscan Style, Spring/Summer 2012 Issue

Here's another use of a rustic beam to provide as the mantle and main focal point on the fireplace.  Architect: Tony Crisafi

Charleston Style & Design, Winter 2012 Issue

 

Tongue and groove ceiling with 2 main larger beams running horizontally in the space with smaller beams creating diamonds in between the 2 main beams.  Designer: Terra Designs

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