Chipotle's Farm Ad: Pros and Cons

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Chipotle Mexican Grill ran a doozy of a commercial during the Grammy Awards - it's been two weeks and it's still buzzing. The company went all out for its' first national ad buy, a two-minute spot during which it screened a short film celebrating sustainable agriculture.


Chipotle Ad


Back to the Start uses stop-motion animation to tell the tale of a small-time farmer who transforms his family farm into an industrialized animal feeding operation, then sees the error of his way and returns to his former small-scale methods.

It starts out as a sweet little Fisher-Price playset of a farm, green and lush with a single red barn and open pastures where a handful of spotted cows and plump pink piggies roam freely.

Then it scales up to a gray landscape of bloated animals, crowded warehouses, and mechanized feeding lines with sludgy feed and a rainbow of chemical supplements. The soundtrack comes from Willie Nelson singing a mournful rendition of the Coldplay tune The Scientist: "Science and progress/Don’t speak as loud as my heart/Nobody said it was easy/No one ever said it would be so hard/I’m going back to the start."


The film succeeds on many levels. It's playful but unsettling. It confronts the horrors and pitfalls of concentrated, mechanized agriculture, but does so without the stridency and gory shock tactics of most animal rights messaging. It's simple but not dumbed down.

The critics began chiming in while the final frame was still flickering on TV screens.
Proponents of Big Agriculture blasted the message as a 'prescription for worldwide hunger,' claiming that they make the tough calls regarding animal husbandry on our behalf.

In a New York Times opinion piece, Missouri Farm Bureau president Blake Hurst warned that our political correctness actually backfires because it drives small farmers out of business because only "big multistate operations will also be able to afford to make the changes, or will at least have the political sway to resist them."

Hurst also questions Chipotle's assumption that a pig would prefer a pasture to a warehouse. Have there been "porcine focus groups," he wonders, with "response meters designed for the cloven of hoof?...For all we know, pigs are 'happier' in warm, dry buildings than they are outside. And either way, the end result is a plate."

(If Mr. Hurst's name is ringing a bell, perhaps it's because he first made a name in the food world as the author The Omnivore’s Delusion, the anti-foodie screed he penned in response to Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma.)

Chipotle also drew criticism from members of the food reform community. Chipotle, whose motto is "Food with integrity," has demonstrated a deep commitment to the humane treatment of animals, but has come under fire numerous times for ignoring the unethical and abusive labor practices of some of its vendors. Some also have a cynical view of a corporation that has co-opted a movement and turned it into a marketing tool.

It's true that we can't presume to truly know what's inside a pig's mind. It's also true that Chipotle mixes self-interest with the environmental message. But ultimately, it's the message that matters. Back to the Start addresses deep and important issues about the food supply, and Chipotle succeeded in bringing them to the attention of a broad national audience.

~Janice

gigabiting.com

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