The Little iPhone That Could

 

A little smartphone had a large database of apps to run.

She was a happy little phone. For she had calendars and contacts to remember. Sports stats and games. There was iBooks, Flipboard, Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn to socialize with. Instagram and Snapseed edited photos while Mail and Messages shared them with friends.

She went along very well till she came to an OS upgrade. But then, no matter how hard she tried, she could not operate all those apps.

She configured and configured. She processed and processed. She rebooted and restarted again. Her fan whirred.

But no! The phone could no longer muster the needed RAM.

What was the user going to do without their electronic leash filled with all the important information?

Finally the data leapt to the cloud. "Surely we can find a replacement to host us," it thought.

Pretty soon it saw a big Linux-based Android standing on an open-source platform. He looked very big and strong. Searching out the app store, the data looked up and said:

“Will you help me download all these files? They are so big and dense and our phone can no longer handle the circuit-based data flow."

The shiny Android looked down at the proliferation of electronic data. The he said:

"I am the world’s leading smartphone platform. I have been formatted for true geek’s to experiment with. My screen is bigger, giving me better immediate glance-ability, so your apps will not understand what to do with the additional pixels. No, I cannot help you,"

The date was sorry, but it went on – searching for adequate computational horsepower.

Because what was the user going to do without their electronic leash filled with all the important information?

Soon, it came to another smartphone resting on the sidelines. The Blackberry was puffing and administering, as if he were tired.

"That phone is not very cool, but it may help me," thought all the data. It ran up alongside and asked:

“Will you help me download all these files? They are so big and dense and our phone can no longer handle the circuit-based data flow."

The Blackberry answered:

"I have just come in from a long, long run as the only smartphone option for businesses. My maker is in a steep decline. Don't you see how tired and outdated I am? Can't you get some other phone to help you this time?

"I'll try," sighted all the data, and off it went. “I must find a way for the user to access their electronic leash filled with all that important information.”

After a while the data found a smartphone just like the previous one – an iPhone 3G. It was worth a try. The data approached and said:

“Will you help me download all these files? They are so big and dense and our phone can no longer handle the circuit-based data flow."

“I am only a little iPhone 3," replied the phone. "I won’t be speedy. And I don’t know how long I’ll be able to handle all of your apps. But I'll be glad to help you, if I can.”

So the data and phone started downloading all of the information. “Do not restart. Installing updates!” thought the new system. Puff, puff! Off they started!

Slowly the apps began to function. Slowly the phone began to belatedly respond to screen taps. As the megabytes filled with data, the little iPhone 3 began to chant:

"I think I can! I think I can! I think I can! I think I can! I think I can! I think I can! I think I can… I think I can… I think I can I think I can…”

And it worked! Very soon the user was able to access their information. They were connected again!

"I thought I could! I thought I could!” sang the little iPhone 3. “Today is WWDC and soon the user will instantaneously access all this data via iOS6. I think I can chug along just long enough until the iPhone 5 is available.”

“I think I can. I think I can!” said the little iPhone that could.

 

"It's double the giggles and double the grins, and double the trouble if you're blessed with twins." Follow our adventures at www.streamdoubletrouble.com

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