Meatful Mondays...

This fall, my favorite 7thgrader developed a tendency to role her eyes at me during family discussions.  I adopted a new policy at the Feed Yard Foodie house to counteract this unacceptable habit—every eye roll is equal to 10 push-ups.

She’s gotten pretty good at them…

This new rule has led to two developments: 1. There are fewer eye roll movements at our dinner table, and 2. My oldest daughter is developing “pipes” for bicep muscles that rival what mine looked like during my competitive swimming days…

This new protocol has been incredibly effective, and I view it as one of my more successful parenting initiatives.  My daughter is refocusing on showing respect for adults while also improving her physical strength.  It’s a win-win deal.  She is a smart kid, and over the past few months she has learned to catch herself right before the “eye roll” starts, simply replacing it with a smile instead.  The result is a much better dinner experience for the family!

The power of a beautiful smile and her Mama’s homemade meat loaf with home grown hamburger and tomatoes!

Every time that I read about the “Meatless Monday” campaign, I experience the same reaction as when my daughter rolls her eyes at me.  Very simply, I get angry.  The campaign (as seen again yesterday by the Los Angeles city council’s announcement) is frequently aligned with rhetoric about improving your health.  In this instance, Councilwoman Jan Perry is quoted as saying that the resolution is part of an overall “good food” agenda for the city which will result in better health amongst the community of Los Angeles.  I disagree with Councilwoman Perry—I believe that beef plays a key role in good health.

Beef’s Competitive Advantage #2

Beef is a natural food that is a great source of 10 essential nutrients including zinc, iron and protein.  There are 29 cuts of beef that meet the government standards for lean—some of my favorites include lean ground beef, tenderloin and T-bone steaks.  All of these 29 cuts of beef have 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat and less than 95 milligrams of cholesterol per 3 ounce serving.  The protein found in beef helps to maintain healthy body weight, build muscle (just look at my daughter’s biceps!), and plays an important role in a healthful lifestyle and disease prevention.

Here’s to strength and good health!

Is it possible to process or cook beef in a way to make it less healthy?  Absolutely…But, there are also a great variety of tasty ways to include healthy lean beef in your diet.  Ways that allow you to focus on good health while enjoying beef’s signature great taste.

Councilwoman Perry, it is not about the beef, it is about the way that it is prepared and what is served to compliment it!

 

I believe that a healthy diet needs to include a diverse selection of food.  I feed my family beef almost every single day because I believe that it is a critical part of maintaining our good health.  I pair beef with fruits, vegetables and whole grains to provide a healthy blend of nutrients.  Between cross country, volleyball, basketball, soccer, gymnastics and swimming– my girls need fuel to get through the day.  Of course, we can’t forget the nightly push-ups either!

The west was won on a diverse diet of meat, grains and vegetables…Her cross country races were won that way as well.

The Feed Yard Foodie house proudly participates in Meatful Mondays

Have you served your family one of the 29 cuts of lean beef recently?  Check out http://beefitswhatsfordinner.com for more ideas of how to fuel your family with great tasting lean beef.

Anne Burkholder

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