What Would You Do If You Couldn't Fail?

Brene Brown's Daring Greatly made me think a lot about failure. When we make ourselves vulnerable we open ourselves to a lot of things, some good and some positive. One of the things that we make possible when we do this is something many people, myself included, fear -- failure. When we make ourselves vulnerable we risk failure and that is a heady, wonderful, terrifying thing. ...more
Like you, I was good at school -- AND good at sports.  I didn't have the experience of trying ...more

Vulnerability and Shame in the Workplace

As we've discussed, feeling vulnerable is hard and frequently scary. The vulnerability hangover? It sucks. When I was reading Daring Greatly I was very wary of what Brene Brown was going to say about vulnerability in the workplace. It's a mixed bag for me. There are workplace environments where I've felt pretty darned comfortable with vulnerability and others where I avoided it like the plague. To my surprise, I found myself nodding right along with a lot of what Brown had to say about being vulnerable at work. ...more
My two least favorite things in life are moving and starting new jobs.  The latter is all about ...more

Plan B Parenting

In no other area of my life have I found myself as deeply vulnerable than as a parent. And that's why -- when my daughter was very young -- if you judged my parenting, I would jump down your throat. Then I would go home and cry and Google parenting websites and hold myself accountable for my daughter's milestone progress, her sleep habits, my mood, her nutrition and the state of foreign wars....more
"Who we are and how we engage with the world are much stronger predictors of how our children ...more

The Vulnerability Hangover

In Brene Brown's Daring Greatly, she talks about what happens after you allow yourself to be vulnerable. She says, with a little help from Leonard Cohen, "often the result of daring greatly isn't a victory march as much as it is a quiet sense of freedom mixed with a little battle fatigue." She sometimes refers to this as the vulnerability hangover. ...more
Exposing our inner selves, on any level, is never easy and doesn't always feel good, during or ...more

The Money and Food Connection

Perhaps the way I saw myself most in Geneen Roth's memoir, Lost and Found, was the way I least wanted to -- the money and food connection. It's an issue I've examined before and would really prefer not to do it again. I want to hide it in a closet and not think about it much the same way Roth funneled her money into her Bernie Madoff savings account and well... we all know how that turned out. ...more
Without going into a saga, my own relationship to food and money is complicated and often ...more

Would You End Up With More Money?

I really try not to think about money too much. If I think about it too much I end up going down the path of questioning if we have enough, if we are doing the right things with our money, if we spend too much of it, etc. I'm sure many of you know the drill. In her memoir, Lost and Found, Geneen Roth performed an exercise at a retreat that stopped me in my tracks and totally flummoxed me. ...more
Yeah, I found myself breezing over this part of the book also, dismissing it as a self-help, ...more

What Do You Value?

After Geneen Roth found out that she and her husband had lost all their money, she was shell-shocked. She was also lucky. They didn't lose their home, they were still working and they stayed afloat. As she tells us in her memoir, Lost and Found: One Woman's Story of Losing Her Money and Finding Her Life, the only thing of value that they lost was their money. ...more
My imagination fails me when I think what it would be like to lose 30 years of savings, 30 years ...more

Money is Expensive

After finishing Geneen Roth's Lost and Found: One Woman's Story of Losing Her Money and Finding Her Life, I had a whole lot of thoughts about money floating in my head. I think there's one that will stick with me for a long, long time and that's the idea that we pay for money, and it's expensive. ...more
I'm married to a workaholic and maybe at the end of his life he'll realize he paid for money in ...more

Noticing the Extraordinary Universe

There are times when we take a step back from our lives and really look around us. When we do, we notice things -- really notice things -- and that changes how we see everything. Noticing those things can change our world. In John Green's The Fault in Our Stars, Hazel's father shares his observations about the universe and life. ...more
I took the time to read some of the other comments.  Turns out we're all pretty comfortable ...more

Why Do We Write?

John Green's The Fault in Our Stars made me think a lot about memories and why we feel the need to write. I think if you ask most bloggers -- especially those that blog about their lives and families -- they'll tell you that they write to remember. By capturing our lives in print and images online, we preserve memories so that one day we can take them out and try them on again. We can see where those moments still fit and where they bust at the seams. ...more
I write to chronicle that which I find amusing/interesting or moments/days/people I don't want ...more