Hugo Schwyzer

Hugo Schwyzer is an American author and speaker who has taught history and gender studies at Pasadena City College since 1993.  In addition to courses on women’s history, men and masculinity, and gay and lesbian history, he developed the college’s first interdisciplinary course focusing on “Beauty and the Body” in the late 1990s, a class he continues to offer today and which focuses on the historical roots of contemporary eating disorders and distorted body image.

A sixth-generation Californian, Hugo received his bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Berkeley and holds a Ph.D. from UCLA.

Hugo has served as a facilitator, workshop leader, and speaker on issues revolving around sexuality, masculinity, and transforming self-image. He has presented workshops on body image, sexual harassment, overcoming perfectionism, and the “myth of male weakness” at institutions as diverse as Fuller Theological Seminary and Brown University.   He is also a frequent guest on nationally syndicated radio programs and has appeared on CNN and CTV (Canada) as an expert on body image, sexuality and gender justice. He has been profiled inNew York MagazineThe Atlantic, and Bitch.

Hugo was a featured columnist as well as Sex & Gender editor for the Good Men Project Magazine. He currently writes the weekly “Genderal Interest” column at Jezebel.  His articles have also appeared in the Guardian, the Los Angeles Times, the Huffington PostAlternet,Role/Reboot, MamamiaModern MomThe Frisky, and many other sites.  His essays are featured in the anthologies Men Speak Out and Best Sex Writing 2012.

Hugo co-authored Beauty, Disrupted – the autobiography of famed supermodel Carré Otis, published in October 2011 by HarperCollins.

Since 2004, he has blogged at http://hugoschwyzer.net/

Hugo lives with his wife and daughter and their six rescue chinchillas in Los Angeles.

The Suitcase Rule: What's Your Approach to Teen Sex?

When I was 17, I brought my first serious girlfriend to spend the weekend at my grandmother's ranch. Before we left, my mother took me aside to remind me of her mother's rule: our luggage would be placed in separate rooms. "Nocturnal traffic," as she put it, between my room and my girlfriend's would be ignored, provided that we were quiet. Is this this how I will raise my own daughter? ...more
@Jane Byers Goodwin NO, me too. Me too. ...more