Roe, Roe, Roe Your Reproductive Health Boat and Get Nowhere

Last Friday, Jan. 22, 2010, marked the 37th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, when the Supreme Court legalized abortion across the United States. This is not to say that abortion was not legal at all before Roe - it was legal in 1/3 of states before Roe, and it was legal in the US before the Victorians more or less ruined everything with their horrid morality issues. But don't get me started on the Victorians... ...more

The "Value" of Females

My brother-in-law and his wife are expecting a baby in June. After they had the 20 week ultrasound, he called to tell me it was a girl. I asked him how they felt about that. "Actually, we are excited because we both hoped for a girl," he said. ...more

Many cultures have engaged in female infanticide.  Inevitably it creates destabilized ...more

Would a Fifth UN Women's Conference Make a Difference?

Jean Shinoda Bolen is asking you to sign a petition for a Fifth UN World Conference on Women. Said petition would be delivered to the UN Secretary-General, to the chair of the UN Commission on the Status of Women, and to the woman who will be appointed to head the new women's "super-agency" in March 2010. Shinoda Bolen explains: ...more

Women Who Plan to Have Lots of Sex May Be Breaking the Law

On January 7, Alex DiBranco reported at Change.org's Women's rights blog that carrying too many condoms and hanging out with another person can get a woman arrested for prostitution in DC. On January, 11, she noted that this insanity is official policy in New York and San Francisco, too. She followed up the next day with the DC Metropolitan Police Department response. ...more

I just read the premisse of your post to my boyfriend who raised his eyebrows and then asked ...more

Is Feminism in the Toilet?

The last few years (OK, decades and really centuries, maybe even millenia) have been challenging ones for women fighting for equal rights. Gail Gauthier at Original Content speculated with a friend that "feminism has gone down the toilet" in recent years. In the Western world, we've been called Nazis, elitists, racists, intellectuals, classists, man-haters, lesbians, witches, and all sorts of other names. (All are true at times except the first slur, which infuriates me to no end.) But a post written by Zachary Mason, a Peace Corps volunteer in Mali, which struck me as earnest if not naive, got me thinking about the importance of toilets to women, and what bathroom facilities mean in strict gendered societies. ...more

We are working with this same issue here in Germany, where only until recently, a woman ...more

Is Sleep a Feminist Issue?

After recapping (to the best of my ability) feminism in the aughts, I am now focused on what I'd like to see happen in the new decade we are in. ...more

I don't think that this post discriminates between women with jobs outside the house and ...more

Murders Down, (Er, Unless You Count Domestic Murders)

Great news: The New York Times reported that murders overall in Philadelphia decreased by 9% last year. The key word being overall. Because the news on the flip side is horrific: In 2009, domestic homicides went up by 67%. Philadelphia isn't the only place that saw a rise in domestic violence: ...more

Don't Drop the Ball on New Year's Eve

I have mixed feelings about the National Institute for Reproductive Health's New Year's Eve birth control campaign, Don't Drop the Ball. It's a humorous website that reminds women that if something goes wrong with their primary method of birth control, women have a 120 hour window to prevent pregnancy by using emergency contraceptives (EC). The site encourages women to send a funny text message about different EC options. There's even a video about a text message mishap to ...more

Feminism and Gender in the Aughts

The last ten years have been nothing if not a roller coaster ride when it comes to feminism and gender. I found the lows to be more plentiful than the highs, but the surprises kept coming. So, in no particular order, here's what stuck out to me: ...more

Choice, Conscience, and Christmas

For the past several years, I've reflected during the Christmas season on what The Annunciation says about women, self-determination, and pregnancy. I've read the story many times - basically an angel comes to Mary to tell her that God chose her to give birth to His son, then the angel gives her some time to think about it, and Mary agrees to do it. There's nothing in there about anyone being forced to give birth to a child that she did not plan for. What's beautiful about the story is that Mary voluntarily says yes, risking serious social ostracizing and other problems. ...more