Military Life

I'm a military kiddo turned military spouse. Yup. I've never known anything outside of military life except for the 3 years after college before I met my husband. I was just talking to the hubs, a few nights ago, about how I don't understand why so many people are fascinated by military life - because for me it's normal life. Because what's fascinating to ME is how someone can grow up with the same people their whole life and live in the same town or state and not move! Now THAT right there is cah-ray-zee! I guess it's just what you know right?!

military

{me and my Daddy-O at his retirement ceremony - we're on one of the planes he designed!}

Growing up with my Daddy-O in the military made me feel so proud. I can't even begin to explain the pride I had knowing that MY Dad was serving our country. Living on the base gave me an appreciation for our country, the men & women who serve, and for all things America! If you've ever lived near a base you know that every - single - day they play the National Anthem at 5pm (time varies base to base). You aren't allowed to drive during it, walk, talk, or MOVE. You stop dead in your tracks, face towards the music and place your hand over your heart. I LOVED when that song came on when I was a kid! Our anthem, to this day, brings tears to my eyes when I hear it.

chelle and jesse

{aah, the early years. we look so young!}

After college, living the "civilian" life, I started to enjoy knowing that I would be living in Ohio for longer than 3 or 4 years. I got a teaching job, started making friends, and about 1.5-2 years after moving there I met Jesse. A year and a half later we got married and then he was headed off to boot camp 4 weeks after our wedding. I guess my idea of living in Ohio for longer than 3 or 4 years went down the drain huh? So, back to the military life. This time as a spouse.

military

{at his basic graduation ceremony}

The spouse role is WAY different than the kid role. I got a front row ticket to my Mother's life. TDY's every other month (that's like a work trip), deployments, early mornings / late evenings, phone calls in the middle of the night, speaking in acronyms, "Last 4 please", being away from family and the list goes on. * Last 4 = the last 4 digits of your social - pretty much your key to survival in the military

family

{L with his Pop-Pop}

Being away from family is one of the toughest parts of military life since having children. When it was just the two of us it wasn't a big deal. We were adults, we missed our family but they've been with us our whole lives. Now that the little ones are involved, it breaks my heart that they aren't growing up with their grandparents, aunts & uncles. Thank the Lord for Skype though! We Skype with our families multiple times a week and the kids know their extended family because of it! I was so worried when my in-laws came to visit us this past September because our kids were going through stranger anxiety - but the minute they saw them they ran over, gave hugs & kisses and said hello! Aaah, glorious technology!

family

{C with his NoNo, that's what he calls her instead of Nona}

Being a military kiddo / spouse has taught me a number of things. I've learned to roll with the punches, have flexibility, be outgoing and meet new people, make each house our home, and to just live life! There aren't many people who can say they've lived throughout the US or lived in a different country (let alone 2 different countries - it's true, I lived in Germany as a kid and now in England). This life has its ups & downs but for now I'm happy God has brought us here. I'm excited to see what the next few years hold for us, and to see if this military life will continue at the end of our stay in England or if it will come to a close.

england

{the village in the distance is where we live! can't beat that beauty!}

 

 

Michelle Parrott 
The Momma Bird
http://www.themommabird.com 

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