"It's Not Fair to the Normal Kids." Are You Kidding Me, Lady?

I told her that my son has autism and she responded, "oh, my nephew is autism." Yes, she said it like that -- should have been my first clue. She continued: "They try to stick him in with the normal kids, but I just don't think it makes any sense. It's not doing ANYONE any good having him with NORMAL kids...." ...more

"It's Not Fair to the Normal Kids." Are You Kidding Me, Lady?

I told her that my son has autism and she responded, "oh, my nephew is autism." Yes, she said it like that -- should have been my first clue. She continued: "They try to stick him in with the normal kids, but I just don't think it makes any sense. It's not doing ANYONE any good having him with NORMAL kids...." ...more
RetiredTeacher         As a retired teachers (taught 23 years) I still substitute at local ... more

Should schools mainstream special ed students?

In October, November, and again in December, The Wall Street Journal ran articles--two of them on the front page--on special education in the U.S. The first article looked at the history of parents asking taxpayers to pay for private school tuition for special-needs children when the local public school district was unable to meet those students' specific needs. The second article looked at a backlash by parents and teachers against the increasingly popular practice of mainstreaming special education students. The third highlighted districts' decisions to place special needs students in mainstream classrooms based on the cost savings such a move engenders. The articles both fit into a larger ongoing discussion in the blogosphere of mainstreaming these students and touched off new conversations about students' needs and taxpayers' responsibility to meet those needs. Here's a roundup of the conversations women--parents, teachers, administrators, and others--are having about mainstreaming. ...more
As a retired teachers (taught 23 years) I still substitute at local schools.  This year, due to ... more