For the love of Fattet Magdous.

If you’re having one of those days where you want to bolt out of the office, grab the first available garden hose and spray-silence the blockhead sitting across from you in the meeting room...more

Eating local in Qatar

Local. Inclusive. Rahash ....more

The Rahash Trail: Four Tahina Halwa Treats to Try in Qatar

This post was meant to be a broad overview of my experience at the Qatar International Food Festival last month, but after waxing 997 words eloquent solely about Rahash, I decided to get this ravishing dessert...more

A Trail of Crumbs: Diving into Traditional Bread Baskets across Dubai

Be it the pillowy pita or the raggedy injera, breaking bread across the many ethnic communities in Dubai is an incredible...more

When sorrow over Safa Park strikes, distract yourself with this food trail.

After being in the food tour business for two years, I don’t know what on earth I’ve been doing writing about one-off restaurant experiences in backstreet here, or hidden alley there. I eat, live, breathe food trails every day of every gluttonous week – and this blog needs to reflect that. So from now, I will switch my old frying pan out for a more exciting one that sautés cherry-picked eateries into a mélange of gastronomic tummy-titillating experiences to keep you foodgasming for hours on end ....more

Nigerian cow’s tail, fishy cookies, camel meatballs and other food moments to celebrate.

Since my last post on greasy comfort-laden strips of Turkish doner, I’ve had a couple of memorable food discoveries that I have to share with whoever cares to know. These are food memories that have connected me in a deep, fulfilling way to some culture, some neighbourhood, or some person making the most incredible lamb ribs in a dug-up corner...more

Layali’s Tonbik Shawarma: The greasy zenith of Turkish comfort food in Naif.

The first time I sunk my teeth into the Tonbik Shawarma, the saucy swirl of condiments and crunchy cabbage and tender chicken and plump grease-sodden fries awoke the sleeping endorphins in my blood stream. This was not sophisticated food. I didn’t feel particularly proud as I contemplated whether the ketchup in the sandwich was Hunt’s or Heinz ....more

Tahtah Malleh – Preserved fish and rice made by the gifted hands of an Emirati mother.

In Emirati lingo, Malleh means preserved fish – from the word ‘Milh’ or salt. It was the natural way of preserving fish back in those days when desert dwellers didn’t have refrigerators. And while I’ve eaten malleh a few times before, nothing comes close to the plate of Tahtah Malleh that mum and I are devouring at the home of the...more
Menu