The Obama's Brillant and Bea

The Obama's Brillant and Beauty

It is only fitting the first person of color to become President of the United States is not only named Barack H. Obama, but his birth as well as his African heritage is a direct descend of African descendants. Why this is important, for the most part slavery separated the African from his heritage and history. Unlike Israel, who also endured 400 years of slavery in Egypt yet, maintained their identity, history and racial roots.

African Americans are the only group of people on earth who’s origin can’t be traced back to any specific land and/or people. If simply being black is the only trademark distinction that connect us to our African descend it’s a shallow one. Through slave trading blacks end up with names like Billy Jenkins, Clyde Johnson and John Smith and so on, names which doesn’t mean anything nor build character, but rather served only as an indication of whose property that slave was or what group of slaves belong to who.

What makes the Obama’s raise from obscurity to prominence so incredible is Micelle’s skin tone and facial feathers. Her appearance doesn’t signify any Caucasian distinction, but rather her facial and physiological feathers are that of most ordinary looking African American women. Micelle Obama is more than a corporate trophy she is a symbol of racial excellence and the Obama’s union display black intellect, pride and beauty.

Again, what make President Obama’s election important to African Americans it’s no accident the first Black president was not named Jenkins, Johnson or Smith. President Barack Obama’s name signify change and hope for a brighter and prosperous America. Then too, blacks can’t claim him as a racial icon no more than whites. Perhaps, he is truly the son who must be without bias and prejudices, the one that’s able to transcend and reconcile race and culture globally. Prince Ella Green League City, Texas

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