Organic Water? What Is Wrong With You People?

ImWithStupid  organic-water-bottle---in2ition

We're used to extravagant claims from bottled water companies.
It’s pure, it's natural, it boosts brain function, improves memory, speeds weight loss, super-hydrates, and rotates your tires.
The latest 'organic' water claims stand out even in such ignominious company.

There is no such thing as organic water.
Water is an inherently inorganic substance. It's H2O, hydrogen and oxygen. It's not alive and never was— that requires carbon. No carbon, no life; which, by definition means not organic. That's why the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the arbiter of edible organics, specifically excludes water from certification.

Some of what's passed off as 'organic' water is water that's sourced from beneath certified organic farmland. The Welsh bottler Llanllyr even claims extra purity because not only are their fields certified organic, but nuns have lived above the source for centuries. It's utter nonsense. Nuns or no nuns, organic-ness doesn't rub off on the water.

There is one product that can legitimately call itself 'organic water,' although you can probably come up with a few of your own choice words for it. WTF?! comes to mind for me.
Koa Water 
squeezes all the water out of organic fruits and vegetables, and then bottles that. Since it uses all organic ingredients, the end product is organic. But is it water?

The company has developed a secret, proprietary technology (they call it the Koa Blackbox) that allows them to extract all of the taste, color, and aroma from the juices. You're left with a clear, flavorless, calorie-free liquid with no discernible trace of the fruits and vegetables it came out of. In other words, water.

Of course none of this comes cheap.
The price of Lanllyr water suggests that the company compensates the Welsh nuns handsomely for any inconvenience caused by locating a bottling operation on their pristine land. Over at Koa, there's the laborious extraction process and pounds of organic produce that go into each glass. But if you've got any cash left over after paying for your organic water, I've got a bridge we can talk about.

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