Phil Kessel Trade Keeps on Giving For Boston Bruins

kessel trade to toronto, bruins

Back in 2009 when the bruins traded Phil Kessel for three draft picks many Bruins fans were upset to let go of the prodigious offensive talent. Yet most fans see the trade as a success today, and this has only become more apparent with the new Tyler Seguin trade as the Kessel deal to Toronto Keeps on Giving.

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When the Bruins initially drafted Tyler Seguin hopes were enormous in Boston. The young forward had incredible speed, a quick wrister, and all the offensive tools to succeed. So when Seguin was drafted fans pretty much thought he would be a clear cut replacement for Kessel, and the other two draft picks received for Kessel were simply a bonus. Well as we know Seguin hasn't worked out but the Kessel deal keeps on giving with the Seguin trade. If you look at the assets from the Kessel deal all spread out you will see that the Bruins took Kessel, a young scorer , and made him into multiple valuable pieces for the team. The total value for Kessel has ended up being enormous.

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When Kessel was originally sent to Toronto the Bruins received a first round pick in 2010 and 2011 while also receiving a second round pick in 2010. With these picks the Bruins Drafted Tyler Seguin, Dougie Hamilton, and Jared Knight. Hamilton has since become a contributor for the Bruins on defense and a man who looks to have incredible potential. Jared Knight, although many people hardly know who he is, looks to be a solid prospect and is ranked as one of the top forwards in the Bruins organization. And of course Seguin was a mild contributor for the Bruins until his recent trade. Where the value the Bruins received for Kessel gets ridiculous is after the Seguin Trade.

The Seguin deal sent Seguin, Peverly, and prospect Ryan Button to Dallas for Louis Eriksson, Joe Morrow, Matt Fraser and Reilly Smith.

Although Peverly had seen some good minutes in Boston he was one of the most replaceable players on the roster therefore trading him is losing no value for the Bruins, and Ryan Button looks to simple be a failing offensive defense man in the Bruins defensive system, so Seguin was the only real value sent away in this trade. What the Bruins got in return was a pure steal. Seguin in his best season as far as production goes totaled 67 points with the Bruins. Louis Eriksson with the Stars eclipsed that point total 3 seasons in a row from 2009-2011. Plus Eriksson is a big body and more fit to play the "Bruin" style of two- way hockey. From a Production standpoint Eriksson equals or exceeds Seguin's contribution to the Bruins. Then you have to look at the other 3 players received in the Seguin trade. Reilly Smith has been a consistent starter this season with Bergeron and Marchand.  He is a young consistent player and has 40 points in 52 games, production roughly equivalent to Seguin when he was with Boston. Then you look at Matt Frasor the 23 year old winger with terrific offensive talent, and Joe Morrow the puck moving defensmen who is only 21 and already has 25 assist with the P-Bruins this season, and this trade looks pretty good for the Bruins. With 2 players in Eriksson and Smith that can double the Production Seguin gave the Bruins, an elite defenseive prospect, and a hit or miss winger prospect the deal looks good for the Bruins.

But that's when you have to think back to the fact that Seguin came directly from the Kessel deal. This means that the Kessel deal to Toronto gave the Bruins Dougie Hamilton, Jared Knight, Louis Eriksson, Reilly Smith, Joe Morrow, and Matt Frasor. That's 2 starters, 2 top tear prospects, and 1 hit or miss offensive talent. The Kessel trade has done absolute wonders for the Bruins Organization and looks like it will eventually give the team 4 quality starters, and trading 1 player for 4 starters is a deal I think any manager would make.

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