Popular TV Show Plot Revolves Around Start-up Business

If you have any doubt about
the impact small business is playing in today’s economy, just tune into ABC’s hit program, Brothers
& Sisters
.  After resigning from
the Walker family business, Ojai Foods, Sarah
Wh
edon, the oldest sibling played by Rachel Griffiths, joins a start-up
Internet company, Greenatopia.
She turns her living room into an office (sound familiar?)  where her two partners and she struggle to get
the site off the ground in time to participate in a big event where they are
confident they’ll attract investment capital. 

With just a week left to go,
the young company runs into financial problems. 
The trio needs $120,000 to finish the site development in time for their
debut at the event.  (It always takes longer and cost more
than you think to start a business.)  Sarah
tells her mother Nora
(Sally Fields)
about their dilemma. 
Nora subsequently convinces  Kitty, (Calista Flockhart), Sarah’s
younger sister, to loan Sarah the money. 
When Kitty offers, Sarah refuses to take her check explaining she has
applied for an emergency SBA loan.  Later in the program Sarah learns the loan is
declined so she swallows her pride and tells Kitty she’s reconsidered and would
like to accept the loan.  Kitty refuses
and suggests Sarah get a home equity loan. 
When Sarah explains she can’t afford to take that kind of risk, Kitty
delivers an important message.

“If you believe in this
company as much as you say you do then you need to put more of yourself on the
line.” 

Most of the time, I think
television programs stray so far from reality that the story lines becomes
ludicrous.  But someone on the Brothers
& Sister’s staff has a good grasp of what it takes to start a small
business.  Kitty’s advice to Sarah about
putting yourself on the line resonates with me. 
I’ve met lots of potential entrepreneurs who weren’t willing to take the
financial risk associated
with starting a business.  Unless you are
fortunate enough to have great connections to money sources, you’ve got to put
a significant amount of your personal assets at risk.  No one wants to invest in an idea you’re not
willing to invest in yourself.  

It will be interesting to
see how this story-line moves along.  With
the current credit crunch, will Sarah be able to get the home equity loan?  Will the Internet start-up attract the
investors it needs?  How will the relationships
among the original trio of founders evolve? 
Rumor has it there may be a little romantic intrigue in the future. 

Whatever happens, it is
interesting to watch a story-line unfold that mirrors what many of us face in
real life.  If you were one of the staff
writers, what would happen next for this start-up venture?

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