A Month of Side Dishes: Quick Pickled Beets and Eggs

Quick Pickled Beets and EggsPickled beets make a pleasing contrast as a chilled side dish for a warm entree. The best part for me, though, is that you can make pickled beet eggs at the same time.

As a child, when my grandmother opened a jar of her pickled beets, she would remove beets to serve and then fill the jar space with peeled hard boiled eggs. By the next day, when we sliced the eggs open, the colors were gorgeous! The egg whites were deep purple on the outside, shading to white around the bright yellow yolks. Beautiful! The flavor was delightful, too–the tang of the pickling juice and beets balanced the mild astringent taste of hard-boiled eggs. Perfect!

Refrigerator Pickles

You can purchase canned or jarred pickled beets, of course, but making them yourself is simpler than you might think. It's an easy way to start learning the art of making refrigerator pickles. Several vegetables commonly pickled can be  prepared as “refrigerator pickles.” Refrigerator pickles won’t keep as long as pickles canned the traditional way, but they are fast to make and will last from a couple of weeks to a year, depending on the vegetables and the recipe you use.

Refrigerator pickles are not as fussy to prepare as traditional canning methods. For example, since the pickles will be refrigerated constantly from the time you make them, jars and lids don’t need to be sterilized by boiling. Cleaning jars in the dishwasher (using the hottest water setting) is typically sufficient. Lids also don’t need an airtight seal. If you use a recipe from a reputable source and follow the directions exactly, the pickles will be quick and easy to make, and safe to eat. (Note: If you've never made pickles before, it’s a good idea to check first with your nearest Agricultural Extension Office for information about food safety and sources of safe and reliable recipes. Be sure to let them know you are specifically looking for “refrigerator pickle” recipes and safety guidelines.)

Below is my recipe for pickled beets. Naturally I tuck some peeled hard-boiled eggs in among the beets as I put them in jars. After sitting overnight in the refrigerator, both beets and eggs will be ready to eat, and I savor every bite.

If you’re willing to let the beets sit in the refrigerator a day or two longer before you serve them, you can slice them into quarter inch slices  instead of dicing them. I used the smaller pieces because I knew they would absorb the pickling juice more quickly. You can also take the eggs to the next level of delicious by deviling them after they’re pickled. 

Buy Local for Best Flavor

My grandmother always started with ingredients from her garden and the farm she and my grandfather owned. To get the same full flavors, I use both ingredients from my garden and ingredients grown locally, which I purchase at farm stores and farmers markets in my area. Once you've tried fresh locally produced ingredients, you'll never go back. The flavor is incomparable. Fortunately fresh beets and eggs are available throughout the winter in most parts of the U.S.

  • Prep Time:
    60 min
  • Cook Time:
    45 min
  • Ready:
    overnight
Servings: 1 quart
Ingredients:
  • 3 medium beets
  • 1 shallots head or small onion, halved
  • 1 sprig rosemary
  • 1 Tbsp butter
  • 4 eggs
  • 1/2 onion, chopped
  • 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup honey)
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 3/4 tsp kosher salt (table salt has additives that can cloud pickle juice)

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Melt the butter and drizzle over the cleaned whole beets. Wrap beets with shallots and rosemary in aluminum foil. Fold edges to seal tightly. Roast in oven for about 45 minutes.

Meanwhile, put eggs in saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a full rolling boil. Boil for 5 minutes, then turn off heat, and leave eggs in the hot water for 10-12 minutes. Drain and rinse eggs in cold water until cool enough to remove the shells.

After beets have finished roasting, let them cool just enough to handle. Remove skins, and dice beets into 1/4 inch cubes. Mix beets and chopped onion, and put into a clean quart jar, putting eggs between layers of beets. (Use a glass jar–beets might stain plastic, and a metal container can make the eggs turn slimy.) Make sure eggs are completely surrounded with beets and onions. They’ll absorb the beet color most evenly if the eggs are not touching the sides of the jar.

In saucepan, mix 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar, 1/4 cup honey, 1/2 cup water. and 3/4 tsp kosher salt. Boil for 3 minutes, then pour carefully over beets. Use a funnel, if necessary.

Put lid on jar (no sealing necessary) and put in refrigerator for at least overnight, or up to several days.

Serving Suggestions:

Serve the pickled beets as a side dish either cold or hot. They can also be served on lettuce leaves with the sliced pickled eggs as a salad. If you have them, saute the beet leaves in butter with a little minced garlic and serve on the side, too, dressed with a drizzle of pickling juice.

Nancy Ging
Whatcom Locavore
whatcomlocavore.com

We want you to share your favorite side! Click here to see how to play along. And check out all the sides we're craving in the Month of Side Dishes series.

Recent Posts by nwlocavore

Comments

In order to comment on BlogHer.com, you'll need to be logged in. You'll be given the option to log in or create an account when you publish your comment. If you do not log in or create an account, your comment will not be displayed.