See Red, Be Red for Equal Pay, today

Red happens to be my favorite color. I'm an Aries after all. A classic one according to my sister (maybe that My Red Shoes

wasn't
meant as a compliment? Pioneering, passionate courageous, dynamic they
say, but also selfish, impulsive, impatient, foolhardy.). Even my
planet, Mars, named for the god of war, is red.

So I laughed when tweets from AAUW and National Women's Law Center (NLRC), two organizations that have been pushing for the Paycheck Fairness Act and have declared this Blogging for Fair Pay Day, told me to wear red today.

No problem. I'll just close my eyes and pull something out of my closet. It'll more than likely be red.

There are many fabulous people blogging today about the fact that
women make on average 78 cents to every $1 earned by a man, and women
of color earn even less: African-American women earn 62¢, Latinas earn
53¢ for $1 earned by white, non-Hispanic men. NLRC can tell you how the
comparison shakes down in your state.

Rather than write a long diatribe, I want to link Heartfeldt readers
to some sources I've found particularly compelling or useful.

I've often said that equal pay should be considered part of the stimulus package. Liz O'Donnell's op ed in the Tucson Citizen explains how the economics work:

It doesn't take an economist to understand that when American
families are struggling, consumer spending goes down. And consumer
spending accounts for approximately 70 percent of total economic
activity. Even the best laid stimulus plan is at risk unless we right
the gender inequities in the workplace.

Closing the wage gap and promoting women in the workplace has to be part of the package if we are going to revive our economy.

Feminist Peace Network continues its "Girl's Guide to the Economy" series with this argument for we should get the additional 22 cents. And the Institute for Women's Policy Research compares pay by profession.

If you twitter, you can go here to read all the #fairpay tweets.

And Change.org gives you all the goods on the history of women's pay progress--and there has been much progress, thanks to much hard work by women and men who have a sense of fairness and equality.

But still, good grief, what makes me really see red is that in 2009, we are still fighting to pass a piece of legislation, the Paycheck Fairness Act (S.182),
that is nothing more than simple justice, and asks companies to do
nothing more than to be fair to all employees regardless of gender.

So right now, while you are all hot and bothered about it, go here to send a message to
your senator, or call him/her at 202-224-3121 and voice your support
for the Paycheck Fairness Act. The bill has already passed the house,
so we're within shouting distance (hey, maybe Arlen Specter's defection to the Democratic party today will put them over the top!)

Wearing red to highlight the need for equal pay shouldn't be
necessary. Equal pay should just BE. But till it is, please see red and
be red with passion for equal pay.

Let's see, which of my 10 red tops shall I wear tomorrow?

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