Talk Back to Backtalk

BlogHer Original Post

The first three episodes of Backtalk have now launched. They are all available for viewing here. It has been so much fun featuring you and seeing many of you for the first time.

The show that really seemed to touch a nerve was the one about Facebook. Boy, did you all have a lot to say.

Cutie Booty Cakes posted a video with her take on the whole facebook friending dilemma.

Hurray for videos!

Blinded by Blonde had this to say:

My son is 18 and in college. I never wanted to be his friend. I want be a Mother that he knows will always love him and trust him to do the right thing because I raised him well, passed no judgment on his friends, and always taught him how to make good decisions. I think its creepy for a parent to want to be a friend of their child on facebook not to mention overly controlling. If you can't give your child space and trust them to act responsibly, than you are going to end up smothering them and they will passive aggressively find a way to release their tension.

I think that children need boundaries. Not an 18 yr old college student, but I wonder if Blinded by Blonde felt the same way when her son was 13 or 14? I also don't think that it is passing judgement to say that other kids are doing stupid things with their facebook accounts. Posting photos in compromising positions or with underage drinking is a stupid thing to do. Wasn't there a Miss America a couple years ago who had Facebook photos of her leaked to the press? A facebook account that she thought was only accessible by her friends.

Sleepy New Mommy echoes my sentiment: 

I was a member of Facebook when it was The Facebook (the original name) and it was only open to college students. We used it to post pictures of parties and find people in our classes. When Facebook went public, we were all frantically pulling pictures down, redesigning our sites, and cleaning up our messes so other people in our lives didn't see them. I'm still doing damage control...

I think this is precisely what worries most of with teenagers. They don't seem to realize that once you put things out on the internet that they are there forever. Pictures can be copied off of a facebook account the same way that they can off of any website.

Nordette has an interesting perspective:

My son won't friend me, but my daughter does. However, she's older. I kind of don't want my son, 18, reading my page anyway. He's got just as many ideas about what I shouldn't say or do as I have about what he shouldn't say or do.

Liz, from This Full House leaves a comment about her video:

To be clear, my kids "friending" me on Facebook was one of my stipulations of allowing them to, you know, have a Facebook account. Aaand, they visit and comment on my Facebook, more than I do theirs. Go figure

I wonder if some of the disparity we are seeing in the comments has to do with the age of the kids involved. 18 and out of the house at college is very different from children who are still in middle school. I would hope that my college age kids would feel comfortable enough to have me as a friend, but once they are legal adults there really is nothing I can do to compel them to friend me.

 My dear friend Lindsay writes:

There's scientific evidence that the part of the brain that determines consequences doesn't develop fully until we're about 25.

Wow, this explains so much about my college life.

Anyway, what we are looking for now are your ideas. It is a show that we hope reflects all of you.

 What would you like to see featured on Backtalk?

Is there anything you see happening in the blogosphere that you think is important for us to talk about?

Let us know in the comments. And if you would like to be featured, let us know that, too!

 

Chris can also be found blogging at Notes from the Trenches

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