Ten Reasons Why I (Still) Love Glee

BlogHer Original Post

The honeymoon is over. Gone are the days of toe deep story lines and nonsensical Madonna tributes. Things have gotten heavy on Glee this season, and it's easy to see why some people are jumping ship. But, I'm going to give you 10 Gleektastic reasons I'm sticking it out for the long haul.

10. Holly Holiday. Dude, I get it. Gwyneth Paltrow has been blasting us with her barely passable vocals since 2000's Duets. (Shut up, you saw it, too.) And, she is nothing if not nails on the chalkboard annoying with all her Goop nonsense. But, she shines on Glee. She's irreverent and clever and aloof in all the right places, a welcome spot of light in a plot line that feels trite and redundant. (Virgin Emma is still brooding after Will despite marrying hot Uncle Jesse? Waa-waaaa.)

9. Nobody gets a rose. A disco ball trophy. Or, an unsupportive juvie baby daddy. Ok, so that last one happened, but still. Sometimes, it's nice to escape from reality television. No outrageous personalities trying to one up each other for more camera time. Just flawed, relatable characters with depth.

8. It's been two seasons, and no one's had a sex tape or nude grainy cell phone pictures surface yet. Can't say that, can ya High School Musical?

7. Mash-ups. Spell check is trying to convince me that mash-up is not a word, but guess what spell check, you're either Amish or live in a bubble, because trust me, it's one of the best words on the planet!

6. Coach Beiste. Kenny Tanaka who? Never have I fallen so fast for such an amazing character. What could easily have been played off as cliche, asexual, female athletic coach in polyester shorts and knee socks, stopped the second she spoke. Every scene with the amazing Dot-Marie Jones is nothing short of a wave of awesome, raw emotion. She makes the campy days of Terri Schuester and Sandy Ryerson about as profound as a Tom & Jerry cartoon.

5. The Warblers, the best thing to happen to a men's ensemble since the Acafellas. "Teenage Dream," "Hey Soul Sister," "Bills, Bills, Bills." Every time they perform, my heart smiles. My heart smiles, people. The only other time that happens is when someone hands me a chubby baby, or that Sarah McLauchlan ASPCA commercial comes on.

4. Disabilities. They have 'em. Glee gives a real, teenage face to high schoolers with disabilities. Cheerios henchman, Becky, who has Down syndrome, and the man with the golden voice, Artie, who's been confined to a wheelchair since a childhood injury, save for when he wears the super expensive, state of the art, robot legs purchased for him from apparent secret millionaire, Coach Beiste. They aren't excluded because of their differences, by rather, a seamless part of the status quo.

3. Burt Hummel. I'm a child of the 90's, so when I see a one, Mike O'Malley, I know him as the comical host of Nickelodeon's game show, Guts. He didn't disappoint then, and he doesn't disappoint now. Mr. Hummel has evolved into the kind of parent I wish all coming of age, homosexual boys could have. He's a role model for parents everywhere.

2. Real life stuff. Glee is going head on with all the topics nobody else is really talking about. Gay and straight sex education, teen pregnancy and adoption, struggling with your sexuality, bullies, alcohol. Sometimes I'm left cringing, googling boarding schools in France for my children, but it needs to be said. And, Glee is saying it.

1. Brittany-isms. It never gets old. Ever. "I don't wanna die yet. At least not until One Tree Hill gets canceled." "Just like I know the cricket that reads to me at night is totally stealing my jewelry." "I made him a card that said heart attacks are just from loving too much." "Please don't pull out all my teeth. I'll look like an adult baby, but with boobs." So, who's with me? (This would be the perfect time to start a dramatic slow clap.)

I say funny things.

Barefoot Foodie

Photo Credit: © Henry McGee/Globe Photos/ZUMApress.com

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