Titanic's Centennial

The Titanic hit an iceberg, or so they say, the night of April 14, 1912, just before midnight.

She sank on April 15. It happened a hundred years ago, today.

The Titanic was built at a time of maritime travel command, when ocean vessels provided the only access to other continents.

This postcard was mailed in 1908. It shows the fascination
with large ocean liners for upper class travel. It also shows
that Peeps traveled in the best company.

 

My interest in the RMS Titanic seriously began when I saw the movie, "The Unsinkable Molly Brown," in 1964. Molly Brown sailed on the Titanic at the last moment, when she learned her grandson was ill and she decided to cut short her holiday in Europe. She was a friend of the John Jacob Astor's and she decided to go along back with them as they had already booked passage. When the Titanic sank, Molly Brown was famous for demanding her lifeboat, No. 6, go back to the scene and pick up survivors. John Jacob Astor did not survive.

When I moved to Denver, CO in the late 1970s, one of the first things I did was go and see the Molly Brown house where she lived in the heart of downtown Denver. The house was not in good shape and the future did not look good for this Victorian architectural treat. As it turns out, however, the house was saved and is now the Molly Brown House Museum, open to the public in all of its glory.

You can imagine the fuss at the Molly Brown House with this being the Centennial year of the Titanic's  sinking. There is a Titanic Memorial Cruise in progress, as we speak, and a blogger, Janet Kalstrom is sailing with it, dressed as a Molly Brown persona. You can read her "Chasing Molly" blog, chock full of details and memorabilia, by clicking here.

It seems that history is not always as it seems.

 

So, I have been following the sinking of the Titanic for many years. Many younger people don't realize that for the better part of my youth, the location of the ship was totally unknown.

When the technology became available to determine its location in 1985, I was spellbound with interest. Eventually, crews with deep water vessels were able to descend far down enough to take photos and send robots wandering through submerged cabins. To me, it was nothing short of miraculous. The coverage in National Geographic was spectacular and I eagerly followed every advance. Today, if you go to the National Geographic web site, there are many Centennial goodies to share.

It is easy with all of the recent technological advances and then, the big screen movie, "Titanic," from James Cameron, to take viewing the submerged wreck for granted. But, for years, I daydreamed about the wreck, wondering if it would ever be found. I can't think of another "WOW" movie moment equal to the transition of the opening scenes when the camera pans down the rail of the underwater wreck and then comes alive into the moment where the ship is loading passengers. I get chills just thinking about it.

Another BlogHer blogger, Sarah of "The Best Stuff", shares her Centennial thoughts and loved the movie as I did. In fact, there are quite a few Titanic posts if one does a BlogHer search.

Another documentary on the possibilities...

 

But, as fascinating as all of that is, the really intriguing bits are the back story of feuding economic barons, who at the time, owned the world and control much of it. JP Morgan was the owner of the White Star Line, which owned RMS Titanic and John Jacob Astor, was a competitor.

Titanic's Ghosts Documentary, thinking of those who died.

 

 

 

NaBloPoMo April 2012

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