Top 10 Greatest Evildoers in Fiction

Top 10 Greatest Evildoers in Fiction

Stephen King has listed his Top 10 Greatest Evildoers in Fiction for Entertainment Weekly. Here is his list:

10. Max Cady- Cady is the crazed-for-revenge psychopath who stalks the Bowden family in John D. MacDonald's The Executioners (1957).
9. Anton Chigurh- Cormac McCarthy's scariest creation. Chigurh's weapon of choice is an air-driven cattle gun that shoots a retracting pneumatic bolt. *This was brought to the big screen in No Country for Old Men*
8. Popeye- Not the cartoon sailor but the small-town criminal in William Faulkner's Sanctuary. He commits the most infamous rape in modern fiction. *makes me wonder how infamous this rape is?*
7. Big Brother- He's watching you from every telescreen in George Orwell's more-relevant-than-ever novel of a nightmare dictatorship. *Big Brother is watching! Again I fail on not reading this book*
6. Harry Powell- The preacher who hounds two children through the pages of Davis Grubb's Night of the Hunter. *I have never read the book or seen the movie*
5. Rhoda Penmark- What a sweet little 8-year-old kid! Too bad she's a cold-blooded murderer. For true malevolence, you have to go to William March's novel.
4. Voldemort- He tried to kill Harry Potter and all his friends. *I know, I am a failure not reading Harry Potter*
3. Sauron- Probably the prototype for Voldemort, but even scarier. Bloated with the power (and the evil) of the Great Ring, the villain of Tolkien's trilogy wants to destroy everything.
2. Pazuzu- The demon who possesses Regan in William Peter Blatty's 1971 novel, The Exorcist. *I saw this movie when I was nine and couldn’t sleep in my bed for a month. And I have walked up and down The Exorcist stairs in Georgetown. Anyone interested in seeing the stairs in July?*
1. Count Dracula- Bram Stoker's courtly, sinister creation is still literature's greatest villain, and although he's been portrayed on the screen by a dozen actors. After the first 100 pages, the sanguinary count mostly lurks off stage. It's a lesson for all of us: Villains are scarier in the shadows. *but if Dracula is anything like Gary Oldman, I wouldn't mind hiding in the shadows with him*
Yes, it is sad on my part that I have only read one of these books.
What do you think of King’s list? Who is your favorite fictional villain that’s missing from this list?

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