TRAVEL: Cleveland Museum of Art

What do families who live in the Midwest and on the east coast do when they want to meet but don’t want to sacrifice ten hours in the car to visit one another? You try to meet in the middle. For us, that meant visiting Cleveland, Ohio.

Cleveland? What can you do in Cleveland?

Prior to our trip, we hadn’t spent much time researching about Cleveland, but a friend who now calls Cleveland home recommended a long list of things to do and places to eat.

What was on the top of her list? The Cleveland Museum of Art.

Architecture of the Museum

Situated among several other fantastic cultural centers, such as the Cleveland Art Institute andSeverance Hall (where the Cleveland Orchestra play), you can feel culture emanating in Cleveland. It also helps to have Case Western Reserve University and these cultural buildings located within walking distance. There’s something to be said about education building and encouraging one another in developing, enriching, and bridging creativity and the arts together.

Cleveland Museum of Art architecture

The crisp horizontal lines along the exterior of The Cleveland Museum of Art give it a clean, modern look. Once we entered the museum to the massive atrium space, I was floored. This was the Cleveland Museum of Art? I had yet to see a piece of art work, and I was already taken back by the sheer beauty of the architecture and interior space of the museum. It reminded me of one of the Smithsonian buildings in Washington, D.C.

Cleveland Museum of Art

Cleveland Museum of Art

You can get a sense of scale of the atrium, when you see how small the other visitors look in the photograph above. They divide the space with well placed vegetation to give the cafe an intimate feel from the expansive atrium space.

Cleveland Museum of Art

The Georgian marble is stunning, giving it a timeless look and richness to the space.

Cleveland Museum of Art

Entrance into the Exhibits

With over 6,000 years of artifacts and pieces of art housed at the museum, there is sure to be something for everyone to enjoy. Here we go…get ready to be blown away by the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Cleveland Museum of Art

Cleveland Museum of Art

(Photo Above: Roman copy after the original Praxiteles abut 400 BC to 330 BC), original at National Museums Liverpool.)

Medieval Armor

If you’re into things from where knights, princesses, and kings lived, you’ll find an impressive collection of medieval armor, weaponry, and history.

Cleveland Museum of ArtCleveland Museum of Art

(Photo Above: Field Armor for Man and Horse with the Arms of Vols-Colonna Family, about 1575.)

Cleveland Museum of Art

(Photo Above: Two-handed Sword of the State Guard of Duke Julius of Brunswick and Luneburg, from the Armory of Wolfenbuttel, 1574.)

Cleveland Museum of Art

(Photo Above: Child-size armor.)

Cleveland Museum of Art

Korean and Japanese Pottery and Art

The museum gives a broad overview of the art of Korea: “Korean art is distinctive for merging many aspects of culture from its East Asian neighbors – Siberian shamanism, , Buddhism, and Confucianism  - with native Korean traditions. The art and culture of Korea reflect these influences, from the adoption of Daoist ideas of the afterlife to the longtime dominance of Buddhist subjects and styles, and to the rise of a simple and humble aesthetic through Confucian political philosophy from the 15th to the 19th centuries.”

Cleveland Museum of Art

I’ve looked through Japanese and Korean pottery before as a teenager, and like a typical teenager, I viewed Korean art and culture with a careless attitude. I couldn’t see the beauty and understand the importance of Korean culture until we shared this experience with our boys. I valued the importance of sharing familial and ancestral history with them to pass along our cultural heritage to the next generation.

Cleveland Museum of Art

Cleveland Museum of Art

(Photo Above: Scroll box with Dragon and Phoenix Design, 1700s – 1900s. Lacquered wow inlaid with mother-of-pearl and twisted brass and copper wire. Joseon Dynasty period, Korea (1392 -1910).)

Cleveland Museum of Art

(Photo Above: Storage Jar, 1700s. Joseon Dynasty period, Korea. Nicknamed “moon jar” because of its shape and color.)

Cleveland Museum of Art

(Photo Above: Bamboo, 1500s – 1600s by Yi Chong. Hanging scroll, ink on silk. Joseon Dynasty, Korea (1392-1910).)

According to the description at the museum, epitaphs, written in Han Chinese script, chronicled birthdays, origins, achievements of a deceased person. The epitaphs below were written for Yi GIha, who was a military official during the Joseon Dynasty.

Cleveland Museum of Art

(Photo Above: Plaque: Epitaphs, 1718. Porcelain with blue underglaze. Joseon Dynasty period, Korea (1392-1910).

Cleveland Museum of ArtCleveland Museum of Art

(Photo Above: Vessel, 400s – 300s BC. Earthenware. Japan, Yayoi period)

Cleveland Museum of Art Japan and Korea

(Photo Above: Yakushi-Nyorai Buddha, 1100s. Made of Gilded wood. Late Heian period, Japan (about 900-1185).)

Modern and Contemporary Art

While I didn’t pay much attention to the names of modern artists, the large art pieces spoke for themselves. Linus particularly liked the “big monkey” portrait.

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