Two For One? Sometimes It’s Better To Just Get Two

Wouldn’t it be great if we were all skilled in everything? Like we were the best at web design and copywriting and bookkeeping? Typically though, we are not. We hire the best person for the job because not only can they do it better, but they will also probably do it faster then we can. If time is money, then we are actually saving money to get the right person plugged in on the things we don’t do all that well.

As recruiters, we sometimes get requests for people who are multi-skilled. Do we have someone who can design a website and then develop it? Do we know of anyone who can write copy and do great design? Can we help find a person who can manage a project and then do some PR? I suppose those people could exist, but it is probably going to take time to find them. Not to mention, if they are that talented, they are likely to come at a cost, because they can demand a larger hourly rate or salary.

What we like to suggest to our clients is to get two (or more) people. We understand that budgets are important, but our experience has shown that getting two people with two very strong skills sets can actually save you money. How? Because they are experts. They are going to work faster, because they are better at it. Meaning, they get work done quickly so you pay less overall. Plus, it is going to be at the quality level you want because they have done this before. They don’t just do this type of work some of the time. They do it all of the time.

Someone who is not an expert in everything is going to bring what they have. It is going to be a split focus. Again, sometimes these people do exist. It is up to you to decide if your schedule will allow waiting to find this person. Or once you find them, if you can afford them.

When you’re looking to get projects done, really think about what it is that you need. If you ultimately think that it is one person doing a dual role, it can really help if there is one role that is more essential. For example, they must be a great designer and if they can also write some copy, that is good too. But what you really need is that designer. Clarity around this will help your recruiter identify the best possibilities.

We have seen what happens when someone with a weaker skill set is asked to step up. The client is typically not completely satisfied.

The next time you need two different skills, consider two different people. That way you’re more likely to be happy with the work and feel that you have gotten some real value in the process.

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