Vomiting And the Best Day in the World

As soon as I hit week 7, I started throwing up. This is what my days look like, more or less. I wake up feeling relatively fine. I get up and eat breakfast, which is when nausea shows up. It then keeps getting worse throughout the day until I vomit. After I vomit, I feel better for about three minutes, and then feel miserable until I fall asleep. I wake up and start over. It's very much the same as with Kai, only slightly worse. 

Just as the last time, I spend a lot of time on Internet looking for miracle cures. I tested almost all of them with Kai, and none worked. But I discovered a new one - bean diet. There is a whole (conspiracy) theory behind the effect of bile on morning sickness and the effect of bean fiber on bile. Basically you are supposed to eat lots of beans. I was skeptical, I'll admit, mainly because if this theory was right, then there would be countries in which women never suffered from morning sickness and as far as I know, a nation like that does not exist. But desperate times call for desperate measures. So I ate lots of beans. And I did not feel immediately better. And at the end of the day, I vomited lots of beans. And that was that. 

I am going to try the very last thing on my list this afternoon - an acupuncture. One last chance. Keep your fingers crossed for me. 

I have to admit, despite all of this, there are things that make this pregnancy easier than the one with Kai. 

I don't work. I have incredible admiration for women (the one I was three years ago included) that go to work every day while feeling this sick (or sicker). It's not fair to them. We all know what a man with a cold looks like. Yet these ladies pull through this terrible misery - don't ask me how, I don't know.

I am very happy that we waited until Kai was the age he was before going for number 2. He goes to daycare three days a week. He doesn't require that much attention anymore. He still naps and goes to bed early. I don't want to imagine how much harder this would be if he was still a baby. I am also happy we waited this long because we got a glimpse into what life will be for us once it's not all about sleep deprivation, feedings, naps, diapers and such. It was good to see it and live it and know it's not too far away. 

I have the best husband in the world, Universe and beyond. He is a single working parent these days. He spends long days and nights in the office and then takes care of Kai when he is home. He doesn't have a minute for himself. And he is still nice. 

I have a friend who brought me a crock pot dinner that I just needed to plug in the wall (picture above). I have another friend who offered to watch Kai in the afternoon, so I can relax. Or vomit in peace. Or whatever the hell it is I am doing these days. I have my family who is far away, but super supportive every day. My Mom, who suffered from hyperemesis gravidarum in both of her pregnancies, meaning that she threw up every day until she gave birth (her record 18 times a day) and left the delivery room skinnier than before she got pregnant, could truly tell me that things could be much worse, but she does not. She feels for me. My in-laws are ready to jump in the car at any time, and they are coming up next week to help while Peter is on call and Kai's daycare is closed for holidays. 

I know this is the last time. It helps a little. It's good to know it's going to be over for good this time. 

Time still drags incredibly slowly.

But we were driving in the car the other day and Peter was telling Kai: "Mommy is in the car, Daddy is in the car, Kai is in the car. We are all together. And when we are all together, that is the best day in the world." A thought crossed my mind that the day would be better yet if I wasn't so sick, but before I even finished thinking it, I realized that does not matter. Peter is right. The day when we are all together is the best day in the world. Period.

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