UPDATED: Victories, Milestones for Women on Election Night

BlogHer Original Post

American women made political history on November 7, 2012. Here are some stories the Center for American Women and Politics have been tracking:

US Senate: A record 18 women have won major party nominations for the Senate, including six incumbents, eight women vying for open seats, and four challengers hoping to knock off incumbents. With nine holdovers still serving, we stood a great chance of seeing a new all-time record number of women serving in the Senate, beating the current 17. The races include three where women are facing off against one another. UPDATE: We have broken the record: Including holdovers, the number of the women in the next session will be at least 19.

Six of the nation’s most competitive Senate races featured women candidates, so the partisan balance in what used to be called “the world’s most exclusive men’s club” may lie in the hands of women:

Nov. 5, 2012 - Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S - Elizabeth Warren, who is running for a seat in the United States Senate, meets with voters after she casted her vote at the Graham & Parks School in Cambridge, Massachusetts on November, 6, 2012. (Credit Image: © Ken Crane/ZUMAPRESS.com)


US House: Another record is the number of women -- 299 -- with nominations for the US House of Representatives. When the 113th Congress is sworn in, we’re likely to witness the greatest number of female newcomers since the 24 who took office after 1992’s “Year of the Woman.” Some of the wins reported in tweets:

New Hampshire: With women running strong races for Governor, U.S. Senate, and both House seats, and one incumbent Senator already in place, the Granite State became the first ever to elect women to every top spot: governor, two US Senate seats, and the state’s entire House delegation.

The Women’s Vote: Have you noticed the presidential candidates tailoring appeals to women? Perhaps that’s because every presidential race since 1980 has featured a “Gender Gap” of anywhere from 4 to 11 points, with women tilting more toward the Democratic candidate than men every time.

We invite you to visit the CAWP website, “like” us on Facebook, and follow us @CAWP_RU on Twitter to see what happens.

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