What Do Our Wrinkles Truly Reveal About Us?

Every time I look in the mirror, it seems another line has developed around or between my eyes. Is it lack of sleep, the stress of work and three kids, or could it possibly be the roadmap to my inner self?  If you ask anyone in North America, they’d tell you those wrinkles are simply a sign of age, and in the next breath, they’d refer you to their plastic surgeon.  But according to ancient Chinese medicine, those lines on your face may tell a deeper story about who you are, and may even provide a roadmap to the inner you.

Jean Haner, author of The Wisdom of Your Face and The Wisdom of Your Child’s Face, recently introduced me to Chinese Face Reading, an ancient branch of Chinese medicine, which is thousands of years old. “The secrets of your inner nature and personal potential are eloquently inscribed in the curve of your cheeks, the shape of your eyes, the contour of your brows, the unique language of your original design.”

Face Reading was originally used as a diagnostic method in Chinese medicine, to help determine someone’s physical health.  But it was also used to reveal one’s inner nature and discover their strengths and their personality type.  Ancient Chinese face readers were so insightful they could be considered the original life coaches, advisors, therapists, and matchmakers.

Jean spends time consulting clients on the deeper meaning behind the features, lines and wrinkles that develop on our faces, so we have a stronger understanding of who we are, where we came from, and how we can use this information to live with more purpose. Despite the recession, id="mce_marker"0 billion was spent last year in cosmetic surgery and other procedures to eliminate these minor signs of aging.  If only we understood the positive message those lines provide, perhaps we could embrace them rather than try to erase them!

Curious about the emerging crow’s feet and changing shape of my face, I asked Jean to do a face reading for me and my family. Before my reading, Jean and I had never spoken nor met. She knew very little about me, my kids, my personality or my life.  Armed with only my birth date, a few photos of me and the kids, and the knowledge of my work at Jill’s List, Jean was ready to begin.  

Her observations of my exterior features (my open eyes, nose, mouth, lines, and ears) helped me understand what my face reveals about me.  She nailed my personality right from the start and “read” different characteristics about how I manage my personal, family and professional life. She revealed what my features say about me, but also how others might interpret my expressions or features. Despite the fact she knew so little about me, Jean really understood my personal and professional strengths, my weaknesses, and the challenges I tackle. It seems the “3000 years of research and development”, as Jean refers to it, really does hold significance and merit.

Jean’s second book The Wisdom of Your Child’s Face, helps parents understand their child’s inner nature and potential.  A reading can help understand what your child’s personal gifts and challenges may be so you can help guide them in their lives. Jean included a mini reading of my three kids and could not have been more accurate about each of their personalities. Quite intriguing!     

The size of a nose, the slant of your eyes, the shape of your brows, or “strength” of one’s jaw can truly uncover whether you have potential to be powerful, active, sensitive, open hearted, generous, compassionate, or have strong integrity.  I learned there is not a cookie-cutter approach to Jean’s readings, but rather an unveiling of how our face weaves together the meanings of all the features, all the wrinkles, and all the markings to reveal the true you.

You can find information about Jean Haner’s workshops and private consultations at http://wisdomofyourface.com


Abby Ackerman

e: abby@jillslist.com

blog: www.jillslist.com/blog

 

 

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