When the honeybees are gone, what will you miss the most?

 

Sadhvi

Time Magazine is just about the only magazine I read.  And while it does look more and more like a comic book these days since there aren't many long articles and there are a lot of short factoids and cartoons, I'm not complaining since that is about all I have time for.

This week though, I read the entire cover story: A WORLD WITHOUT BEES: THE PRICE WE'LL PAY IF WE DON'T FIGURE OUT WHAT'S KILLING THE HONEYBEE, written by a young man named Bryan Walsh.

It's not only disturbing, it's alarming really, because many of my favorite foods are going to be disappearing if there are no bees to pollinate those plants.

"There were just barely enough viable honeybees in the U.S. to service this spring's vital almond pollination in California, putting a product worth nearly $4 billion at risk.  Almonds are a big deal - they're the Golden State's most valuable agricultural export, worth more than twice as much as its iconic wine grapes.  And almonds, totally dependent on honeybees, are a bellwether of the larger problem.  For fruits and vegetables as diverse as cantaloupes, cranberries and cucumbers, pollination can be a farmer's only chance to increase maximum yield.  Eliminate the honeybee and agriculture would be permanently diminished.  "The take-home message is that we are very close to the edge," says Jeff Pettis, the research leader at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Bee Research Laboratory. "It's a roll of the dice now."

Everyone wants to know why they are dying, but no on has even mentioned cell phone towers.  There seems to be a connection since the bees have been dying off only in last ten years or so, about the time when cell phone towers began to spring up all over the world.  Hmmm...I have to wonder if those towers have disrupted the honey bee's instinctual sense of direction that makes them not go back to their hives?  Maybe the connection will never be investigated because god forbid we have to give up our smartphones!  There are other things that making them die, like mites and parasites, and chemicals.  It's probably all of the above.

Or could it be the aluminum that is being sprayed from planes?  I wonder what happens when those chem-trails eventually dissipate and land on things, like flowers and places that bees land on, and maybe ingest?  Wait a minute, what about us?  Oh oh!  I better stop right now, because if the bees are getting affected by something, then maybe, so are we!

It might be that it is something that won't be taken very seriously until it's too late.

Let me just ask you, which food or crop will you miss the most?

With almonds being 100% dependent on pollination, apples, asparagus, avocados, broccoli, blueberries and onions are 90% dependent.  Cherries, cucumbers, and celery are 80%.  Plums/prunes and watermelon are 65% dependent on bee pollination, with tangerine, lemon, and the cotton industry also being affected.

I can tell you that I will miss almonds the most: I love them!  I especially like the almond butter from Living Tree in Berkeley, California.  I also like to make a Tuscan Biscotti that really won't be the same without almonds.

I noticed that in an interview with the author of the Time article, Bryan Walsh (see below), it seemed like the young news reporter's didn't quite take the whole issue too seriously.

Hey, maybe future generations won't even know that there were things to eat called almonds!

Ok, now that I'm sounding old and sentimental, I will end this post this week by saying that I hope you are enjoying this beautiful life and not taking it all for granted.

xxx

Sadhvi

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