Standing Up For Chick-fil-A

Syndicated

The ruckus over Chick-fil-A raises the question: Who's behaving like the hater here?

Chick-fil-A president and chief operating officer Dan Cathy's recent comments in Baptist Press should come as no surprise. The company is privately owned. In 45 years of existence, their restaurants have never been open on Sundays. They've always supported a traditional, Biblical definition of marriage and family.

"We intend to stay the course," said Cathy in the article. "We know that it might not be popular with everyone, but thank the Lord, we live in a country where we can share our values and operate on biblical principles."


Chick-fil-A

Image: SanFranAnnie via Flickr

 

So, let's see. They haven't changed their religious views. They aren't refusing to serve people who disagree. We're free to express our beliefs in this country.

Why the uproar now?

Chick-fil-A's charitable donations were being criticized before the Baptist Press published their story. When Cathy reiterated his long-held convictions, in a religious publication mind you, Chick-fil-A critics were poised to pounce.

Cathy was labeled homophobic. Activists boycotted. Boston's mayor banned Chick-fil-A from the cityThe Jim Henson Company broke ties with them.

Another commentator wants public schools and sports facilities to stop doing business with Chick-fil-A because they support families through non-profit groups that share their beliefs. Are you kidding me?

Attacking a successful company is unlikely to change anyone's mind. It won't help the economy either. Plus it's mean.

My affection for J Crew clothing is well-documented in my blog. The company contributes to causes at odds with my values. Last year J Crew president and creative director Jenna Lyons left her husband of nine years and the father of her son for another woman. Not a decision that lines up with my faith.

I suppose I could stop buying clothes from J Crew, write nasty grams on their Facebook page, insist they be thrown out of malls that have received tax breaks, and start picketing their stores.

But that would just make me a bully who's missing out on some mighty fine fashion, now wouldn't it?

Chick-fil-A uses their resources to support and care for families in ways they see fit. That includes contributing to non-profits that share their beliefs.

Speaking from experience, that also includes family activity nights at their restaurants, refreshing beverages for free, and politely carrying trays to tables for mothers like me who have their hands full. Besides, the food is delicious.

I don't hate gay people. I don't believe the Cathy family and their franchisees hate gay people. I don't plan to stop eating at Chick-fil-A anytime soon. I understand if your convictions differ. You can stop eating there if you want.

You'll be missing out on some mighty fine chicken if you do. But as for me and my family, we will serve the Lord. from Joshua 24:15 NLT

The Chick-fil-A Song by St. Louis comedian Tim Hawkins with a new verse for Chick-fil-A founder Truett Cathy.

Will you eat mor chikin?


~Aimee

Aimee Whetstine blogs about a variety of topics at everyday epistle. She and her family live in Wichita, Kansas, a city that welcomed their first Chick-fil-A restaurant earlier this year.


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