Why I write about food

I’m beginning to think I write about food because it’s easier than writing about the reality of our world. It’s easier than writing about war, women being abused everyday, or children dying of hunger. It’s easier than talking about the difficulties of parenthood, the struggle to make ends meet, loneliness, or fear. Instead I focus on the “right” way to make a margaritahow to make your own preserves, and how to take the seeds out of a pomegranate. 

M.F.K. Fisher said that she wrote about food, because writing about food and the hunger for it, was writing about love and the hunger for it. She mastered this beautifully, and her work speaks for itself. I on the other hand, find myself wondering wether I should be writing about more meaningful subjects or trying to make a difference in the world in some other way. Suddenly the proper technique to cook bacon seems so insignificant in the large scheme of things. ( As I was writing this I was actually cooking bacon, and I got so distracted  I completely burnt two good slices, oh the irony!)

However, food is important, we all must eat to survive. Somehow it seems that there is more to food than that.  Currently this is perceived in the numerous celebrations that revolve a around a feast, such as birthdays, weddings, graduations, and even funerals. Food in these celebrations is not served to satisfy physiological needs only, but it is served in order to establish social and emotional bonds between those present.

 

To some, food is a necessity that is not fulfilled. What about them? How can we continue to talk about food, tweet what we had for breakfast, and spend money on the latest kitchen gadget or cookbook when millions of people die from hunger every year? Well, have you heard of Maslow’s hierarchy of values? According to Maslow, certain needs must be met before people are willing to consider others; the first need to be met is the need for food, water, and shelter. So you see, this is really why I write about food, to feed the hungry, and with this blog, to help you feed your hungry. Then, once we are all satisfied and content we can begin to consider others, and finally come together and talk about the things that matter.

Chorizo, Chestnut & Sage Stuffing

Yield: 6 servings

Time: 40 min.

Ingredients:

Chestnuts, fresh, roasted, chopped1 lb.
Sourdough bread, cubed6 cups
Carrot, large, chopped1 ea.
Onion, yellow, chopped1 ea.
Celery, stalks2 ea.
Chorizo (Mexican not Spanish), pork12 oz.
Sage, fresh1 sprig
Chicken stock1 cup
Heavy cream½ cup
Egg, large1 ea.
Salt, kosherTo taste
Black Pepper, groundTo taste

 

Preparation:

  • Preheat oven to 375F.
  • Spread cubed bread on a sheet pan and toast in oven, about 5 min. Set aside.
  • Puree carrot, onion, and celery in a blender until it becomes a fine pulp.  Set aside.
  • Set a large sauté pan to medium heat and add chorizo. Cook chorizo stirring frequently until slightly brown, about 5-7 min. Remove from pan and set aside.
  • Add vegetable puree to sauté pan, reduce heat to low, and cook until almost dry. Remove from pan and set aside.
  • In a large bowl combine chorizo, vegetable puree, bread, 1 cup of chestnuts, and chopped sage.
  • In a medium bowl, whisk chicken stock, egg, and heavy cream. Pour over bread mixture and fold to combine.
  • Place mixture in an 8 x 11 baking dish, and bake for 30 min. uncovered, or until top is golden brown.

 

Chef Notes:

Best stuffing ever!

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